Career
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Dancers love Kickstarter. Over the past eight years, more than 2,300 dance projects have brought in more than $12 million through campaigns on the site. Even traditional companies like Martha Graham Dance Company and MacArthur "genius" award-winning choreographers like Michelle Dorrance have gotten in on the action.

But starting today, the site is announcing a new platform called Drip that aims to be even more useful for artists. Rather than having to set up a new campaign for each project, artists can build a community of support for their ongoing creative practice. Supporters pay a monthly "subscription" fee for perks like exclusive behind-the-scenes footage, ticket discounts, in-person meet-and-greets with the artists—whatever artists want to offer. And that means the artists can count on a regular pool of funds from fans paying as little as $2 a month.

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Health & Body
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Perfectionist, type-A dancers often try to squeeze a million things into their days, waking up early to cross-train or staying up late to finish one more side project.

But the next time you're tempted to skimp on your slumber, consider this: The longer you sleep, the more benefits you get from it. With each sleep cycle, your body spends more time in that deep, restorative REM stage, and releases another hit of testosterone and human growth hormone, both of which facilitate physical repair.

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News
Dancers in the new Perles Family Studio. Photo by Robert Benson, Courtesy Jacob's Pillow

Heads up, choreographers: Jacob's Pillow just announced the launch of a new choreography program, starting next summer.

Inspired by the famous Bessie Schönberg workshops from the '80s and '90s, the Ann & Weston Hicks Choreography Fellows Program is designed to help eight early-career choreographers (approximately 20–30 years old) refine their voices and expand their networks. The program, August 21–31, will be directed by none other than pioneering choreographer Dianne McIntyre and renowned Limón teacher and choreographic advisor Risa Steinberg.

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Breaking Stereotypes
Photo courtesy Strava/Brooklyn Mile

This Sunday, about 50,000 people will be lining up in Staten Island to run 26.2 miles for the New York City Marathon. I'll be one of them.

When I tell people from the dance world that I'm training for what will now be my eighth marathon, most can't comprehend why I would want to do something so boring. Many dancers can't see the point of repeating the same movement over and over for four or five–odd hours when you could spend that time dancing, moving your body in so many different, more fun and interesting ways.

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News
Photo via Instagram

The messages started coming in Monday evening. A concerned teacher was worried about several dancers she knew at American National Ballet—did we know what was going on? Later that night, more information started emerging on social media—and it was clear something was up at the Charleston, South Carolina–based company.

We've been interested in ANB since its debut was first announced in April—not only was it a brand new company, but one with close to 50 dancers, and some major names attached, like Rasta Thomas, Sara Michelle Murawski and Jessica Saund. The founders, Doug and Ashley Benefield, had few ballet credentials but they made an encouraging promise to highlight diversity, hiring dancers of different body types and races. A story in Charleston's The Post & Courier reported that they had a strategic business plan to support the company through for-profit ventures such as a licensing enterprise, a dancewear line and an academy.

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Career
ODC/Dance in Boulder and Bones

It's not often that you hear about dance companies that own not one, but two buildings, where they also run a school, theater, gallery and even a health clinic for dancers. But ODC/Dance is an inspiring success story. Since founding the company in 1971, Brenda Way, along with co-artistic director KT Nelson, has created a self-sustaining model that's still going strong almost five decades later.

Dance Magazine spoke to Way ahead of the company's performances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music this week to pick her brain on how she's done it. Here's the advice she has to offer the next generation of dance directors:

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Dancers & Companies
Delores Brown, photo via mobballet.org

When we're talking about the history of black dancers in ballet, three names typically pop up: Raven Wilkinson at Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, Janet Collins at New York's Metropolitan Opera and Arthur Mitchell at New York City Ballet.

But in the 1930s through 50s, there was a largely overlooked hot spot for black ballet dancers: Philadelphia. What was going on in that city that made it such an incubator? To answer that question, we caught up with Memoirs of Blacks in Ballet founder (and frequent Dance Magazine contributor) Theresa Ruth Howard, who yesterday released her latest project, a video series called And Still They Rose: The Legacy of Black Philadelphians in Ballet.

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Health & Body
Nathan Sayers

When you're dancing for what feels like eight days a week, it takes more than just stretching to put your body back in order. You need a good rub down. Unfortunately, most of us don't exactly have the money to afford an on-call personal masseuse.

The solution: Self-massage, with foam rollers, lacrosse balls, elbows and anything else that can help loosen up your muscles. We dug into Dance Magazine's archives to find the best pieces of advice we've published on the topic. Follow these rules to get what you, ahem, knead out of self-massage.

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