Breaking Stereotypes
Melina and Regina Willoughby, photo by Ashley Concannon

There's a surprising twist to Regina Willoughby's last season with Columbia City Ballet: It's also her 18-year-old daughter Melina's first season with the company. Regina, 40, will retire from the stage in March, just as her daughter starts her own career as a trainee. But for this one season, they're sharing the stage together.

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Health & Body
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Soreness is a fact of life for dancers. But rather than relying on over-the-counter pills, try managing your pain by sprinkling some turmeric on your food instead. Multiple scientific studies have proven that curcumin, the active substance in turmeric, has powerful anti-inflammatory properties.

How To Do It:

To help your body absorb turmeric's benefits, have a small amount (just one-fourth of a teaspoon) three times a day, along with a meal or snack that includes some fat and some fiber.

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Dance Magazine Awards
Rennie Harris Puremovement. Photo by Christopher Duggan

Some nights, you head home buzzing with energy. After last night's Dance Magazine Awards, we were dancing with it.

We had the privilege of honoring four legends of our field—Rennie Harris, Marika Molnar, Linda Celeste Sims and Diana Vishneva—in a ceremony that was filled with inspiration and beauty.

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Dancers & Companies
Lindsay Thomas

This fall, Dance Magazine followed Noelani Pantastico for a day as she was rehearsing "Emeralds" and performing "Diamonds" in George Balanchine's Jewels. It was the start of the principal's third season back at Pacific Northwest Ballet, returning to the company she grew up in after a seven-year journey dancing with Jean-Christophe Maillot's Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo.

Here are a few of our favorite images and insights from the day:

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Dancers & Companies
Photo courtesy National Dance Institute

When Jacques d'Amboise talks about dance, his eyes light up, his chest opens and his famously handsome smile takes over his face. It's immediately clear that the former New York City Ballet star, now a spirited age 83, has a love of dance that doesn't tire.

Today, he's creating new generations of dance lovers through the National Dance Institute. He founded the program in 1976 out of a desire to teach dance to public school students. Now led by Ellen Weinstein, NDI reaches 6,500 students every week, not only in New York City, but across the country and even in international cities like Shanghai. And d'Amboise's dream of inspiring others through the art form he loves so much continues as strong as ever.

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What Dancers Eat

'Tis the season to have some fun in the kitchen. If you want to get more creative than simply baking another pumpkin pie, try these Nutcracker-themed treats—created by and for dancers. These recipes from former Boston Ballet and Joffrey Ballet dancers were first published in Dance Magazine's December 1990 issue. Today, they're still guaranteed to turn any holiday party or dressing room into a true Land of the Sweets.

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Health & Body
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When dancers get injured, they often think they should eat less. The thought process goes something like, Since I'm not able to move as much as I usually do, I'm not burning enough calories to justify the portions I'm used to.

But the truth is, scaling back your meals could actually be detrimental to your healing process.

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Career
Drip's homepage

Dancers love Kickstarter. Over the past eight years, more than 2,300 dance projects have brought in more than $12 million through campaigns on the site. Even traditional companies like Martha Graham Dance Company and MacArthur "genius" award-winning choreographers like Michelle Dorrance have gotten in on the action.

But starting today, the site is announcing a new platform called Drip that aims to be even more useful for artists. Rather than having to set up a new campaign for each project, artists can build a community of support for their ongoing creative practice. Supporters pay a monthly "subscription" fee for perks like exclusive behind-the-scenes footage, ticket discounts, in-person meet-and-greets with the artists—whatever artists want to offer. And that means the artists can count on a regular pool of funds from fans paying as little as $2 a month.

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