25 to Watch
Photo by Patrice Mathieu, Courtesy Ashbee

Creating dance as a medium for eliminating taboos has been cathartic for radical, riveting Montreal-based dancer and choreographer Daina Ashbee. Her highly physical, personal work dealing with topics such as female sexuality, anorexia, trauma, loss, the menstrual cycle and Indigenous women has garnered accolades: At the prestigious 2016 Prix de la Danse Montreéal, she received both Le Prix Découverte de la Danse (emerging artist award) and the Prix du CALQ for Best Choreographic Work (for When the ice melts, will we drink the water?).

Keep reading... Show less
News
BJM's Benjamin Mitchell and Kennedy Kraeling. Photo by Marc Montplaisir, Courtesy BJM.

In a surprising move last February, Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal announced it had struck a deal giving it worldwide exclusive dance and circus rights to legendary singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen's repertoire for five years. The particularity of the terms and Cohen's godlike status in his hometown of Montreal indicated this was not business as usual for the company. BJM's ambitious Cohen-inspired show, Dance Me, debuts December 5–9 in Montreal, and then begins extensive touring nationally and internationally.

Keep reading... Show less
Magazine

Montreal’s National Centre for Dance Therapy is the first of its kind.

 

 

Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal is expanding the scope of its artistic activities with some outside-the-box thinking: using dance as an activity to improve the quality of people’s health. On April 23, LGBCM officially announced the creation of the world’s first National Centre for Dance Therapy, in partnership with health and higher-education institutions in Quebec. “We’re increasing our outreach, bridging the health and arts sectors,” says LGBCM executive director Alain Dancyger.

 

At left: Photo by Marie-Reine Mattera, design by Upperkut, Courtesy LGBCM.

 

Canada has few accredited dance therapists, and those that are, were certified through American Dance Therapy Association programs. The new center offers three interconnected services: dance/movement therapy, clinical research, and a graduate-level degree training program in dance therapy. The company is partnering with New York’s 92Y Harkness Dance Center and licensing its ADTA-certification curriculum.

 

This September, the first 20 students will be selected. Candidates must either be enrolled in an MA program, or have five years’ professional dance experience—a requirement that, Dancyger says, is likely to provide new job opportunities for professional dancers transitioning out of performing careers. Three intensive three-week training sessions at LGBCM’s Montreal-based studios will start in July 2014, continuing over an 18-month period. A multitude of employment possibilities will await graduates, both at the center and within the health care system.

 

The first phase of pilot research projects, pegged at $285,000 (Canadian), is funded by Quebec’s Ministry of Health and Social Services. The new center has teamed up with Concordia University’s PERFORM Centre, a clinical research facility promoting healthy living, to study whether dance can improve physical and cognitive health in elderly populations. Other studies could involve children with physical or sensory deficiencies, as well as research with cancer patients.

 

Dancers & Companies

George Stamos
Agora de la danse
Montréal, Québec
October 6–9, 2010
Reviewed by Philip Szporer


Stamos' torso, Pinto's legs in
Cloak. Photo by Julieta Cervantes, courtesy Agora de la danse.

 

George Stamos infuses Cloak with a smooth interdisciplinarity, working video, sound, music, movement, and voice into the mix. The theme of transformation permeates, inviting questions about hybridity and the fracturing of the self. It’s a stacked proposition that succeeds in fits and starts.


Earlier this year, the Montreal-based dancer/choreographer showed a preliminary version of the work at Baryshnikov Arts Center. Over time, the piece has evolved from a solo to a trio and now a well-suited duet, in which Stamos pairs beautifully with dancer extraordinaire Luciane Pinto.

 

The darkly lit Cloak opens with Stamos reading a scripted text, a kind of reflective inner monologue made public (he would have benefited from nuanced line readings). It then segues into a random, amusing conversation between Pinto (who has been munching carrots) and Stamos, his voice altered through a processor, allowing him to “morph” into different characters. Next, the duo flows through an interesting sequence of repeated, floor-based rolls with a clearly articulated, gentle, and pleasurable rhythmic quality, set to the live, recorded, and manipulated sounds of a sigh or a whack of the mic.


By turns whimsical and edgy, Stamos smartly addresses anonymity and the identity card in an episode where he dons about four layers of white head stockings. Using a simple marker, Pinto scribbles eye and smiley-mouth lines on the material. As the first mask is cast aside, another blank slate is revealed. Ultimately each layer is removed.


In an inventive use of video (by Dayna McLeod), either Pinto or Stamos stands behind a suspended screen, with only their legs showing—on one occasion, Pinto doing some pretty fierce ballet legwork. Each merges with projections of the other’s upper body, or at one point a metallic alien-appearing creature.


The problem with Cloak is its sketchiness. Ideas become diluted as the piece ensues. A section with the performers costumed in distorted black ninja bunny costumes comes and goes; the videos themselves lose their punch through repetition (a technical glitch the night I saw the performance is noted but didn’t alter my perspective); and Tomas Furey’s original electroacoustic score is a lulling wash of sound.


Stamos exploits a multi-tracked and fragmented structure, but his strongest material loses impact. He never fully flavors other sections, and, at least for now, masks his ambitions.

Dancers & Companies

[bjm_danse]
Soirée Aszure Barton (presented by Danse Danse)
Salle Pierre-Mercure, Centre Pierre-Péladeau
Montréal, Canada
November 27–29, 2008
Reviewed by Philip Szporer

 

Photo by Jean Tremblay.

Dancers of [bjm_danse] in

Aszure Barton's Les Chambres

des Jacques.


Together Aszure Barton and [bjm_danse] (formerly Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal) are something to celebrate. The musicality of the energy-driven dancers is perfectly suited to Barton’s exuberant, ever-changing movement innovation. Their quick, limber physicality and mercurial sensuality are vital ingredients of the successful Soirée Aszure Barton. The good-looking dancers know how to work a move. The remarkable ensemble has the soul, intensity, and drive that jazz requires, and their long clean lines and versatile technique speak to a classical base. They also have a commitment to whatever they are dancing, and Barton strikes gold with that. In both pieces on the bill—Les Chambres des Jacques and Jack in a Box—her broad taste in music is equally key.


Barton’s appeal is her popular sensibility and her engagement with the dancers. For Chambres, a reprise from 2006, she takes the audience into the world of various Jacks, as embodied by the wide range of movers who reveal shades of their individual natures. She introduces them one by one, in solos, presenting differing movement styles (modern, hip hop, gymnastic, etc.) and a varied music score, stirring the Québécois folk sense of Gilles Vigneault, Vivaldi arias, klezmer and gypsy rhythms. The piece takes on a layered feel as the performers overlap, and in the process gives us a sense of a larger community.


Jack in a Box
(which premiered earlier this year at the Canada Dance Festival) explores community, with the group defined by grey school-type uniforms (shorts and shirts) and a soloist in shirt, tie, and slacks. That strict, formal sense evolves bit by bit, and we witness individuals in transformation, breaking out in a variety of iterations, from the sacred to the profane. The sense of playful, youthful exuberance and percussive movement, with jumps and sinuous spins, pushes aside any sense of conformity, and the quick-witted dancers are brilliant at this kind of double-playing. The finale, set at a Last Supper-like table, sees its cast of nine together creating detailed studies with minimal movements: synchronized palms banging, a tilt of the head, a hop or a glide, or a tap of a finger. Once more, the weave of music is compelling, with Kodo drumming alongside Mannheim Steamroller, chanting, and funky Robert Charlebois. Unfussy lighting by Daniel Ranger seals the deal.

 

Head north and cross the border to Montréal and you’ll find a place of unbridled creativity. Ardent travelers know that this bilingual city resonates with both the style and charm of Europe and the bright-lights allure of a North American hub. Long dance traditions in New York, Paris, London, and Berlin might eclipse Montréal in historical terms. But the city’s current boom, which is rooted in artistic renewal, shifting cultural identities, and vibrant social buzz, makes it a fulcrum for powerful invention.

 

Montréal blasted forward as a center of contemporary dance in the mid-’80s. Its diversity of voices included large established companies like Les Grands Ballets Canadiens and Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal, as well as artists ranging from Margie Gillis, Édouard Lock, Marie Chouinard, and Ginette Laurin to Paul-André Fortier and Jean-Pierre Perreault.

 

Because the Québécois are proud of their artists, financial support from government agencies and arts councils kept apace with the burgeoning dance community. This has resulted in a stimulating environment with a strong sense of continuity over the last nearly 30 years. Many of the city’s dance artists have not only established ties within the borders of Québec and Canada, but also across the globe.

 

Before the boom, there were perhaps a handful of professional dance companies. According to the Regroupement québécois de la danse (RQD), an umbrella advocacy organization for professional dance practitioners, Montréal is now home to about 30 professional dance companies and dozens of independent artists, creating jobs that attract more dancers to the city. Another enticement comes from the RQD, which, through its training reimbursement fund, subsidizes dancers by paying a big chunk of their class costs.


Major Companies
After more than 50 years, the still-potent Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal, under the direction of Gradimir Pankov, has a rich European repertory. Choreographers like Jirí Kylián, Mauro Bigonzetti, and Stijn Celis are drawn to the versatile dancers’ musicality, virtuosity, and imagination. The 36-member company is truly international, with 13 dancers from the U.S. It has lots of projects on the go including a countrywide contest for emerging ballet choreographers. The company is a favorite at Jacob’s Pillow, and an exchange with the Houston Ballet will see them perform in Houston next month (Houston Ballet performed in Montreal last spring).

 

Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal, now known as [bjm_danse], has evolved with the times, shifting from a cool jazz bent to a more sensual and energy-driven contemporary repertory. Its excellent dancers (three are from the U.S.) shine in delicious concoctions from the likes of Vancouver-based Crystal Pite and rising star Aszure Barton (see cover story, April).

 

Édouard Lock’s company, La La La Human Steps, is known for its daring physical extremes. In his oeuvre, the contemporary, postmodern, and balletic traditions collide. His latest pointe-based work, Amjad, comes to the Brooklyn Academy of Music in November.

 

For decades Marie Chouinard and Ginette Laurin have hypnotized and invigorated audiences. Chouinard makes sexually provocative group pieces like Orphée et Eurydice, which courts Cirque du Soleil playfulness, Las Vegas entertainment values, and in the end is a well-designed frolic. Laurin’s O Vertigo company has developed a highly poetic vocabulary that plays with perception. Both dancemakers recently moved into new state-of-the-art studios.

 

Montréal Danse, with its contemporary repertory, has a long history of inviting choreographers to work with its theatrically engaging performers. It recently premiered British Columbia–based dance artist Sarah Chase’s new work, On the Ice of Labrador, involving highly intimate storytelling.

 

Independent artists

In terms of Montréal’s stars, few attract the kind of allegiance that Margie Gillis and Louise Lecavalier do. Gillis, celebrating 35 years of dance creation, is a major draw, and continues to inspire audiences. Her repertory includes her well-known solo pieces, as well as works featuring a range of performers from opera singer Jessye Norman to rising dancer/choreographer Emily Molnar. Lecavalier, La La La Human Steps’ luminary for nearly two decades, with her muscular, pumped-up body and her fearless physicality, challenged gender lines and conventions. Lecavalier retired from the company in 1999 and has since developed her own projects, including working with Crystal Pite and the innovative improviser Benoît Lachambre.

 

Outside the mainstream, Paul-André Fortier (Fortier Danse Création) continues to raise the bar and, at 60, is at the height of his creative powers. His projects question the rituals of dance itself: How do we use space? How do audiences watch dance?

 

Andrew de Lotbinière Harwood, one of the pioneers of Contact Improvisation, is a respected teacher and the founder of AH HA Productions. Due in part to his influence, there is a strong Contact community in Montréal and the rest of Canada.

 

Belgian-born choreographer Isabelle Van Grimde (Van Grimde Corps Secrets) set down roots in Montréal because she found something fresh in comparison to what she knew in Europe, where she felt there was a blasé attitude. What she encountered in Montréal were people who were enthusiastic and encouraging of enterprising artists. The same could be said for dynamos Los Angeles–born Victor Quijada and Venezuelan-born José Navas. Quijada, with his Rubberbandance Group, bridges elements of b-boying and ballet. Navas and his Compagnie FLAK create “abstract” pure dance with a Cunningham-esque edge.


The Next Generation
Doors are open and change is afoot, especially for an extremely mobile younger generation of choreographer/movers like Dana Michel (Band of Bless), Sasha Kleinplatz/Andrew Tay (Wants & Needs), Hinda Essadiqi, Jean-Sébastien Lourdais, Frédérick Gravel (GravelWorks), and Katie Ward. None of them works on the scale of a Chouinard or Lock. But they are creating links and networks, locally and internationally, quite independently of any preordained circuit. Dave St-Pierre,who pushes the limits of physical dance-theater with raw energy, nudity, and chaotic sensory overload, has European presenters hot on his heels.

 

In fact many Montréal artists aim to work for stretches of time in Europe, not only for artistic affinities, but also because producers there invest in dance with services and cold hard cash. Some companies could not survive without these commissions and touring possibilities. There’s simply not enough touring in Québec, or in the rest of Canada.


Spaces
When the pioneering choreographer Jean-Pierre Perreault—renowned for his landmark piece, Joe, with a cast of over 30 trench-coated, black-hatted average Joes—opened his choreographic center in 2001, he was intent on providing artistic residencies for choreographers both nationally and internationally. Unfortunately the center closed its doors in 2004, less than two years after his death.

 

That closure prompted reflection, and things started percolating. The multidisciplinary Studio 303, which presents a monthly dance series and workshops throughout the year, also has hosted a Canadian-European exchange and an annual NY Artist Exchange with New Dance Alliance. Circuit-Est, founded in 1987 by a group of independent artists who wanted to share resources, moved into Perreault’s former center this spring and offers an eclectic roster of workshops.

 

Festival TransAmériques, devoted to the best in international contemporary dance and theater, inaugurated its first season last year, and serves as a springboard for local dancemakers. A smaller festival, Transatlantique Montréal, is a gutsy fall event that democratizes dance, bringing performances to nontraditional venues outside the downtown core.

 

Place des Arts is Montréal’s grand hall, with five theaters. Dance is presented throughout the year, and Les Grands Ballets Canadiens is the resident dance company. The more intimate Cinquième Salle is where the Rubberbandance Group is in residence.

 

The singular dance presenter Danse Danse has an international scope, welcoming Geneva’s Le Ballet du Grand Théâtre, Akram Khan (with French star Juliette Binoche), and Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui this season. Other well-attended spaces devoted to dance include the Agora de la danse, Espace Tangente (run by American-born Dena Davida), and Centre Pierre-Péladeau. Many of the big names, the hottest young choreographers, and everyone in between, got their start at Tangente.

 

The Montréal dance field is dense with artists of every stripe and season, and the dance card is filling up, in part because the schools and universities keep pumping out new graduates. But the terrain is fertile because dance artists from all over Canada and across the globe come to Montréal. The city is an entryway to ideas, connections, and new possibilities—a place where imaginations are evolving.

 


Philip Szporer is a Montréal-based dance writer, lecturer, and filmmaker.

Sponsored

Videos

Sponsored

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox

Sponsored

Win It!