Rant & Rave
Ratmansky at MCB. PC Daniel Azoulay

And if that statement rubs you the wrong way—particularly coming from a highly acclaimed white male choreographer—you're not alone.

On Sunday, American Ballet Theatre artist in residence and international ballet choreographer Alexei Ratmansky posted this on his Facebook page:

Obviously, there's a lot to unpack here. And many of the comments did the unpacking for us:

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Popular
via Instagram, Tiler Peck

We're less than a week away from New York City Ballet's Fall season, and the only people more excited than us might just be the dancers themselves. It officially kicks off on Tuesday, Sept. 19 with Swan Lake, and the dancers have been hard at work perfecting their swan arms. And with some major debuts—Tiler Peck and Megan Fairchild as Odette/Odile and Zachary Catazaro, Gonzalo Garcia and Chase Finlay as Siegfried—there's even more buzz than usual around the ballet classic.

But if you can't wait until the season starts, we've been keeping an eye on the dancers' Instagram accounts for all of the behind-the-scenes action.

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Career

Lurking on dancers' social media pages, among the video clips of superhuman pirouettes and the photos that immortalize them above the stage in grand jeté or crouched on a windowsill wearing lingerie, pointe shoes and a sultry expression, is the occasional political post.

It's hard not to have a political opinion in the age of Trump. And on social media, opinions are easy to express. We might have to thumb the history book all the way back to Abraham Lincoln to find a more polarizing president (alas, the two leaders' similarities decisively end there).

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Advice for Dancers
NYCB's Maria Kowroski, with Dylan, and Abi Stafford, with Colin. Photo by Kyle Froman.

I feel torn about taking time off from dance to have a child. I'm married and my biological clock is ticking. I just don't know what age to take the leap for the health of the child.

—Would-Be Mother, San Francisco, CA

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Dancers & Companies

At this point, I don't think we can bear to see another botched ballet video. How many times do non-dancers have to don pointe shoes or a leotard and prance around for popular outlets like Vogue Spain and Vanity Fair? (No, Kendall Jenner, we don't think you're owning those pointe shoes. And Elle Fanning? We don't want you to show us how to "make a ballet turn." *Face palm.* Don't even get us started about this ballet tutorial where Petra Collins "teaches barre" to Vanity Fair staffers.)

Dancing is for everyone, absolutely, but let's leave the professional representations to the professionals. It's not about being elitist. It's about respecting and honoring the incredible hard work and dedication that dance requires.

*Steps off soapbox.*

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Career

Dylan (left) and Colin (right) are already getting used to life backstage. Kyle Froman

Chatting with NYCB principals Ashley Bouder, Abi Stafford and Maria Kowroski about dancing through motherhood.

Throughout New York City Ballet’s almost 70-year history, very few dancers have returned to the stage after having a baby. Yet the company is having something of a baby boom right now, with three principal dancers currently diving into motherhood while upholding their careers. In March, writer Jen Peters sat down with Abi Stafford and her 8-month-old Colin, Maria Kowroski and her 4-month-old Dylan, and an 8-months-pregnant Ashley Bouder to discuss motherhood in the life of a principal dancer.

Jen Peters: What was early pregnancy like, and how did you tell the company?

Ashley Bouder: I was preparing Swan Lake when I found out. I had to tell the costume department, and then I told Peter [Martins]. He had the best reaction, just so happy! I was also getting sick during rehearsal, so I told John Stafford, who was rehearsing me, so we could end early some days or take it easy.

Maria Kowroski: The company was in DC when I was two months pregnant, and, of course, I was performing in a white leotard. My chest was really big and I kept thinking, I hope no one can tell! I kept closing my dressing-room door and taking naps. I finally told Peter because casting was going up and I didn’t want to do Concerto Barocco because it’s too hard (and in white)!

Abi Stafford: I had to do an extra Dewdrop during Nutcracker the day after Christmas. I was almost thinking I should just tell them so I wouldn’t have to. But it was almost time for my three-month checkup, and I wanted to be sure everything was fine before I told anyone.

JP: Did anyone ever assume you weren’t coming back to perform?

AB: I think everyone here knows you are coming back, but I’ve had outside people say, ‘Oh, so you’re done dancing?’

AS: Or they say, ‘Are you going to teach now?’

Kyle Froman

MK: I’m glad it happens to you guys too. Since I’m old, people always say that!

JP: What’s your time frame for postnatal recovery?

MK: I am planning to start back the first week of spring season, so five months after delivery. It’s really individual; the company is very supportive.

AS: I had Colin in July and came back for Nutcracker. I scheduled outside gigs to give myself a goal of four months off. I was really grateful to have my first show in Maryland, not New York!

AB: I’m maybe overly ambitious. I’m hoping to take two months. My friends tell me the longer you stay home, the harder it is to go back!

JP: How did you approach class during pregnancy?

MK: I took class until nine months, just barre and a bit of center. I didn’t wear my pointe shoes because I was afraid of breaking my ankles, since I was so heavy!

AS: I performed until four months, took class through five months and then stopped. I was afraid to overexert myself, so I just enjoyed some time off. I did absolutely nothing!

AB: I still do everything except jumps, and am hoping to wear my pointe shoes the whole pregnancy. I stopped jumping around six months because Marika Molnar, our director of physical therapy, watched class and didn’t like how it looked for my back.

JP: Did you continue with full extensions, too?

AB: Yeah, I can’t bend backwards, but my arabesque somehow got better? My hips don’t feel any looser, though; my side extension feels tighter!

AS: I never felt any looser either!

JP: How did you deal with the physical changes?

Kyle Froman

AS: I definitely had some body-image issues. I didn’t really accept what was happening to my body until about six months. Afterward my doctor said to be patient and trust that everything will go back. 

MK: It was hard not being able to fit into costumes. Watching the scale go up at the doctor’s office was strange. But as long as the baby is healthy, that’s what matters.

JP: What did you do to get back in shape?

MK: I started with Gyrotonic, to get everything strong again, and bike and elliptical for cardio.

JP: Any pregnancy cravings?

MK: I ate healthier than normal, a lot of salmon and eggs for protein. Towards the end I really lost it, though—all I wanted was chocolate and cheese.

AS: Me too. Towards the end I’d get Frosties and McFlurries. And white chocolate!

AB: I was the opposite. Right away I only wanted sweets. I would have a pint of ice cream for dinner while performing Swan Lake! It was ridiculous. Now all I want are big salads and Mexican food.

JP: Coffee during pregnancy?

All: Yes!

JP: How do you find balance between work and baby?

MK: I’ll start with sporadic performances. Things are happening quickly—sitting up, rolling over—and I don’t want to miss out.

AB: I’m excited to have my fiancé bring her to the theater during performance nights. She can hang out with all the girls backstage.

[Maria looks at Dylan lying on his stomach in a frog position.]

MK: Ahhh, he has great turnout…bad feet, but great turnout! That’s okay, we don’t want you to dance, anyway!

JP: I was going to ask how you feel about your kids dancing…

AB: My fiancé already said, ‘No stretching the baby!’

AS: He’ll only dance if he asks and shows interest.

AB: It’s difficult to have a child want to dance, because we’ve made it to the top of our field. I would never want her to feel inferior to her mom, who at that point will not be cool!

JP: Do you think being a dancer helped with labor/delivery?

MK: I don’t think it helped at all! It is such a normal thing that every woman’s body can do, and I realize how truly amazing our bodies are. This pain was like nothing I ever experienced as a dancer. I did labor standing up and in second-position grand plié trying to get him to come down!

AS: During labor Colin wasn’t dropping, so they almost did a C-section. But with all my core strength, I said ‘Get down!’ My doctor couldn’t believe I actually birthed him that way. After going through childbirth I feel like I can do anything onstage.

JP: Is anything about childcare surprising you?

MK: The amount of time breast-feeding requires. I was in tears a lot that first month because I felt like I couldn’t go anywhere.

AS: The first two weeks were the most difficult because you just aren’t sleeping. But the hardest thing was giving myself over completely. It was quite an adjustment.

JP: How did you decide this was the right time to become a mother?

AB: I’m 32, and I wanted to come back and still be at the peak of my career.

Just before this issue went to print, Bouder gave birth to Violet Storm de Florio. Kyle Froman

AS: For my husband and I, it was our plan to have a baby around this age—I’m 33—so it was mostly the clock-is-ticking thing.

MK: I wondered what my body would be like after having a baby: What if I can’t dance as well? What if things don’t work the way they did before? I wanted to feel completely fulfilled before having a baby.

JP: In NYCB history, few dancers have had babies and come back to perform, and now all three of you, all principals…Do you feel like something is changing?

AB: Definitely. People are going to college and doing more outside projects. People have realized you don’t have to be a tunnel-vision ballerina—you can be just as dedicated and as good an artist with more going on in your life.

MK: If not better!

AB: I remember Margaret Tracey being phenomenal after two babies!

AS: And Kyra Nichols, too, Jenny Ringer, Jennie Somogyi…

JP: What do you think the difference is?

MK: It’s a different mentality. For me, this [holding Dylan] is such a huge priority and a happiness you can’t get from anything else.

AS: Maybe the dancing pressure is off a bit because you realize what real stress is!

AB: But you can also really enjoy your time being free and dancing, free of all that responsibility while doing something you love, and then go home to someone that you love.

MK: I feel like such a pedestrian still. I have a new appreciation for what we do as dancers. It will be unbelievable to get back to that level, because it feels so far away! I will truly appreciate being onstage and having that escape from everything. It will be my time. In the end we still are our own people, even as mothers.

Jen Peters is a contributor to Dance Magazine, a dancer and a mother of two in Brooklyn, New York.

Magazine

Ballet stars are diving into creative projects on the side.

Ashley Bouder and Amar Ramasar before an Ashley Bouder Project performance. Photo by Dan Freeman, Courtesty Freeman.

Although he was hard at work this spring creating a new piece for Boston Ballet and performing with the company, principal dancer Jeffrey Cirio somehow made time for even more dance. This summer, his new choreographic side project, Cirio Collective, will premiere in Massachusetts. With help from his sister and fellow principal Lia Cirio, he has been working on videos for the new website, talking to costume designers and searching for music.

Cirio is among a pack of entrepreneurial ballet dancers looking to branch out at the peak of their careers. Troy Schumacher’s BalletCollective, Daniil Simkin’s INTENSIO, Daniel Ulbricht’s Stars of American Ballet and Ashley Bouder’s Ashley Bouder Project are other budding examples. And though dancers forming pickup companies isn’t exactly a new notion, past iterations have mostly been summer layoff projects that combined well-known repertoire and big international stages. These talents represent a new breed of do-it-all artists who prize small-scale projects and artistic collaboration. And the DIY culture of the digital age makes it easier than ever for star dancers to give voice to their artistic visions and connect with curious fans.

Bouder, who doesn’t choreograph but directs Ashley Boulder Project, felt an urgency to experiment before it was too late. “I am over 30 and I don’t know when my technical ability will drop out,” she says. “There are a lot of things I want to do before that happens.” A large part of her vision is connecting with audiences in areas where dance is underserved, like the rural Midwest, with discussions and workshops. Currently, she’s fundraising for a dance film, and is focused on showcasing female choreographers, most recently Andrea Schermoly and Adriana Pierce.

For Cirio, forming his own troupe has allowed him to experiment with his choreography in a small, intimate setting. Though he’s thankful for his opportunities to make dances for Boston Ballet, he had a desire to create without the pressures of the big stage. “It’s not about trying to please a director or the artistic staff,” says Cirio, who hopes to expand the troupe’s vision to include other choreographers and non-dance artists. “It is just about us getting in the studio and sharing our ideas.”

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Magazine

The new Ailey repertoire is going to knock your socks off. In a recent rehearsal of Aszure Barton’s new piece, I was blown away by the searing, pulsing vitality of it. The company is also taking on Wayne McGregor’s hyperactive, strangely clinical, kinetically powerful Chroma. Plus there’s Bill T. Jones’ hard-driving, exhilarating D-Man in the Waters. These three works are technically confounding for dancers—and will bring the audience at Ailey’s City Center season up to the minute in currency.

Our cover story reveals Ailey artistic director Robert Battle’s thinking behind his choices, as well as the challenges that two of his most stunning dancers, Jamar Roberts and Rachael McLaren, face with these new works. In Kina Poon’s “The New Ailey,” you’ll get a sense of how much the company has changed, and yet how much the Ailey spirit has remained an anchor.

On the other side of the dance universe, I got to see the legendary Lyudmila Kovaleva teach class at the Vaganova Academy in St. Petersburg last June. Apparently, Kovaleva still, to this day, coaches her former student Diana Vishneva on certain roles. That gave me the idea to ask Vishneva, as well as other top dancers, about their favorite teachers, the ones who really made a difference. Read “They Taught Me To...” to learn who Ashley Bouder, Kathleen Breen Combes, Desmond Richardson, and Jason Samuels Smith cherish as the mentors who changed their lives.

 

Right: Rachel McLaren and Jamar Roberts in Barton's LIFT. By Jayme Thornton

While I watched class and rehearsals at the old Mariinsky theater, I was surprised to encounter a British dancer. I had no idea that Xander Parish had left The Royal Ballet and joined the Mariinsky. He guided me from one studio to another, and I soon realized that his story could be told quite nicely in a “Why I Dance”—which appears on our back page this month.

Lastly, this is my final “Curtain Up” because I have transitioned into a role as editor at large. As you will see in “DM Recommends,” a book of my writings has just come out, and it has opened up some new opportunities for me. I am leaving the magazine in good hands, those of the very capable Jennifer Stahl. I have enjoyed working on Dance Magazine immensely.

 

Wendy Perron, Editor in Chief

wendyperron@dancemedia.com

dancemagazine.com/blogs/wendy

twitter.com/wperrondancemag

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