Photo by Nathan Sayers for Dance Magazine

In Broadway's CATS, Giuseppe Bausilio exploded across the stage as the wild and rascally Carbucketty. With fiery exuberance, he transformed steps into drama, songs into lullabies, dosing out magic with his sheer joy of performing. He recently left his cat suit behind to join his fifth Broadway show, Hello, Dolly! Though he's only 19, he makes dreams like "originating a leading role on Broadway" sound possible.

Broadway shows: Currently in Hello, Dolly!, starting previews this month. Past shows include CATS, Aladdin, Newsies and Billy Elliot.

Television: Plays Alfie, a dancer and runaway prince, in Season 4 of "The Next Step," a Canadian teen drama about an ultra-competitive dance team

Age: 19

Hometown: Bern, Switzerland

Training: Began studying ballet at age 4 at his parents' school, American Swiss Ballet, in Bern and New York City

Accolades: Youth America Grand Prix silver and bronze medals, junior division; additional awards from competitions in France and Italy


Photo by Nathan Sayers

Special sauce: Bausilio credits his family for where he is today. His parents were both professional dancers and his older brother, Yannick Bittencourt, is a dancer at the Paris Opéra Ballet. "They taught me how to be a professional at a very young age," he says. "I take a ballet class every morning."

A little luck and lots of hard work: While at YAGP, a casting director spotted Bausilio and asked him to audition for the role of Billy Elliot. He barely spoke English and his only training had been ballet. Bausilio spent the summer speed-learning tap, hip hop, gymnastics and singing. "I nodded a lot and pretty much said yes to everything." It paid off. He got the role and spent two years playing Billy Elliot on tour, in Chicago and on Broadway.

An unexpected curve: Three months into CATS, Bausilio's back gave out. Doctors found a rare vascular tumor in his spinal canal and removed it during a six-hour surgery. "I think this was kind of a sign telling me, 'Giuseppe, you've got to breathe for a second.' "

"Every choreographer in NYC will be fighting over the chance

to have Giuseppe in the trenches with us!" —Andy Blankenbuehler

Bouncing back: Bausilio was out of CATS for 15 weeks and used the downtime to work on his upcoming EP and a one-man cabaret show—he's also a singer/songwriter and plays guitar and keyboard.

What Andy Blankenbuehler is saying: "Giuseppe has impeccable dance technique. He sings like a bird and is a pro at creating a character through his performing," says the CATS choreographer. "But his passion is what makes him a standout. He has a generosity of the heart that touches everyone onstage and in the audience."

What's next: The ensemble of Hello, Dolly!, starring Bette Midler. "It's insane, the people I get to work with," Bausilio says, and chants a litany of names: "Warren Carlyle, the choreographer, Jerry Zaks, multiple Tony Award–winning Broadway director. Amazing people, legends! I think I've used the words 'insane' and 'crazy' about a hundred times in this past hour. But that's really what my life has been."

CATS holds a sacred place in many dancers’ hearts. Tackling T.S. Eliot’s alternate, feline universe offers a chance to be part of a legacy, and cast members speak reverentially of the show’s whimsy and technical demands. Now, in the current revival on Broadway, a new litter is exploring Andy Blankenbuehler’s movement layered in with Gillian Lynne’s original choreography.

Pazcoguin runs through her solo 30 minutes before curtain. PC Jim Lafferty.

Georgina Pazcoguin: Victoria 

Backstory: Also a New York City Ballet soloist, Georgina Pazcoguin is known for exploring unorthodox roles. But although she was always drawn to CATS’ theatricality, she never thought she’d perform it. Now she’s donning a white unitard as Victoria, the balletic kitten coming of age. 

Committing:CATS is a weird show, so you must be fully committed. That’s why we do our own makeup and spend so much time crawling around finding our own cat.” 

Solo Work: Victoria’s iconic solo is filled with endless développés punctuated by twitches and swerves, ending in a Pilates-teaser–like seat. Pazcoguin first learned it from Lynne for a performance with American Dance Machine for the 21st Century last year. “Gillian, an 89-year-old woman, schooled me! I was sore for days. The tempo and control are difficult, and at the same time, Victoria’s exploring her own body. The second I start, I think of a waterfall flowing off my body.” 

Hanes channels his Fosse felinity as Rum Tum Tugger. PC Matthew Murphy, Courtesy CATS.

Tyler Hanes: Rum Tum Tugger 

Working With Andy Blankenbuehler: “Andy’s brain is always going. He takes this show to a different level. He understands a dancer’s body and knows what looks good.”

Becoming Tugger: “Since my background is Fosse, with that slink and felinity to it, I’m giving myself permission to be free in that vein. But also, I feel like the character has a mind of its own. Before, I felt like I was trying to emulate Andy to be ‘correct.’ Now, the movement is coming from a place of character. It’s more fun. Tugger dancing is not Tyler trying to dance like Andy!” 

Body Prep: Because of the snug costume, Hanes had a clear

vision of what he wanted the character to look like: Adam

Levine. So, he hired a trainer who’s helped him to build strength, not bulk, through basic strength-training moves like squats and

bench presses.  

Shonica Gooden: Rumpleteazer 

Ubeda (left) and Gooden (right). PC Jim Lafferty.

Backstory: Gooden had never seen CATS, but she wanted to work with Blankenbuehler again after performing in Hamilton. “When I watched the video, I thought, What did I get myself into?!” Now, she’s fallen in love with the show’s themes of forgiveness and community.

Becoming Rumpleteazer: Gooden and Blankenbuehler worked together to make her Rumpleteazer sassier than other versions. “I made her unapologetically part of my culture: Being a black woman, that sass and attitude was naturally coming out. I didn’t want to suppress it.” 

Two-Person Cartwheels: To tackle the tricky double cartwheels with Mungojerrie, danced by Jess LeProtto, the two initially practiced daily during the lift call preshow. “I learned to place my hands on his thighs exactly the same every day. If you hesitate, it’s not happening!”

Feline Features: “If I’m relaxed, I keep my fingers closed for a calm paw. But when Grizabella comes on, I open up my fingers for claws and my shoulders tense up.”

The Naming of Cats: The cast often calls each other by their cat names. But, there are variations. “Georgina is so spicy in the show, and she has so much attitude. So I said, ‘Your name is Lakisha.’ It stuck.”

Ricky Ubeda: Mister Mistoffelees

Backstory: Ubeda wore out his VHS copy of the London production as a kid. “I cried for three days when I got this part.”

Making Mister Mistoffelees: While Mister Mistoffelees is traditionally pulled up and über-clean, Ubeda and Blankenbuehler agreed theirs would be a cooler, more personable cat. “He loves to get the party started, and I have this theory that he teaches the other cats to dance.”

Rough Rake: “In rehearsal I had found my flow, but then I got to the rake and cried. Now, I’ve gotten to the point where I don’t fight the rake. If it’s throwing me, I just go with it.”

Fauré as Demeter. PC Jim Lafferty.

Kim Fauré: Demeter

Backstory: This show was one of the reasons Fauré started dancing. “It was my plan to be in a ballet company for a few years—and then CATS for the rest of my life.”

Feline Features: To keep her sophisticated character intact even when she’s not dancing, Fauré lies on her stomach, paws crossed and one leg bent.  

Body Prep: To handle the demands of the show, Fauré cut out sugar to avoid inflammation and upped her potassium, vitamin B, calcium and magnesium to keep her muscles pliable.  

Fame: Tons of fans wait outside to meet the cast, and Fauré thinks it’s because everyone can find a cat they connect with. “You can see yourself in the cats.”

Corey John Snide and Emily Tate: Coricopat and Tantomile

Tate (left) and Snide (right) danced together at Juilliard before joining the show. PC Jim Lafferty.

Backstory: Pre-Broadway, the two danced together at Juilliard. Now, they play twin cats.

Twin Tales: The twins are clairvoyant, and Blankenbuehler allowed Tate and Snide a large role in creating their movement. “During one moment when the whole stage goes into slow motion, he said, ‘I want the intuition to come from your head,’ ” says Tate. “We created a movement where we take our hands next to our ears as if a thought bubble is popping out.” 

Bloopers: Since the pair works so closely, snags are unavoidable. Snide says, “One day, my unitard got stuck on her tail, I ripped my arm away and it went flying!”

Duo Details: The whole cast improvises certain sections. But for their version of improv, Tate and Snide have to maintain almost identical movement. Snide says, “The details, the position of our legs and contraction of our backs, are essential to creating the look.” 

Blankenbuehler updated the choreography, but kept its sensual felinity. PC Jim Lafferty.

Layers of Choreography

When CATS first opened on Broadway in 1982, Gillian Lynne’s choreography earned much of the accolades. Infused with jazzy ballet lines, her now-iconic movement struck spectacularly odd shapes to depict energetic, sensual felinity.

For the revival, the team brought in man of the moment, Tony Award–winner Andy Blankenbuehler to add his take. Fresh off Hamilton, he integrated his blend of gestural hip hop and cool jazz into the framework. Fans still find Lynne’s trademark portions. But audiences looking for a modern stamp now enjoy details like a techno-fab Mister Mistoffelees nailing tilts in an LED-light jacket. “We don’t move the way they did in the ’80s,” says Ricky Ubeda. “But it’s great training to dive into that style and then be balanced by Andy’s storytelling choreography.”

For the dancers, this combination meant double benefits—and double challenges. To ensure Lynne’s portions were tackled correctly, one of her associates oversaw rehearsals. “She’d explain the heart and the direction of those sections,” says Kim Fauré. “Then, we could approach the layers of Gillian’s and Andy’s work more easily.”

If you still don't know what you're going to be for Halloween, don't panic just yet. Dance Magazine has your back. Whether you're heading to a party, dressing up for technique class or doing some good ol' trick-or-treating, there are countless costume options that take inspiration from modern, ballet and Broadway. (Chances are you already have the basic pieces in your closet!) Snag one of these ideas, or riff off one to create a unique look. Happy Halloween!

Cartoon by Jessica Love in The Juilliard Journal via juilliard.edu

Go Modern: Want to transform into Martha Graham? Purple fabric can do wonders. You're sure to get some confused looks from your non-dance friends. Bonus points if you do an excerpt from Lamentation and give a mini dance-history lesson.

If you're even nerdier, you can create your own version of one of Alwin Nikolais' imaginative costumes. Back in college, I showed up to a party for dance majors in this gem, based on "Mantis" from Imago. Peruse the racks at Goodwill for colorblock clothing, paint your face white and fashion a hat out of a Styrofoam cup and elastic.

Left: "Mantis" from Imago. At right: Madeline Schrock's take on the original.

Cat costumes also require meowing. The cast of Broadway's CATS. Photo by Matthew Murphy, Courtesy DKC/O&M.

Broadway Bound: Characters from the Great White Way provide endless costume ideas. If you're looking for French flair, try these dreamy pieces inspired by An American in Paris. Flouncy skirts and wrap sweaters in pastel shades evoke the fashion of late-'40s Paris.

For a classic musical theater look (but still with plenty of "razzle dazzle") rifle through your drawers for fishnets and a black leo. Or, check out these costumes based on iconic looks from Chicago.

If you've ever wanted to be a Jellicle cat, now's the time to make use of that unitard at the back of your closet. Add some fur trim, ears and creative makeup based on your favorite feline from CATS.

Dressing up as a founding father doesn't have to be stuffy. Borrow a look from the cast of Hamilton, by pairing a ruffled blouse with a military jacket and boots.

Graceful Ballet Looks: Take a page from American Ballet Theatre principals James Whiteside and Daniil Simkin and dress up as your favorite ballet legend. Last year, the two transformed into Gelsey Kirkland and Mikhail Baryshnikov.

If you are addicted to "The Walking Dead" and ballet, this costume is for you. "One year as a last-minute costume, I was a zombie ballerina," says DM assistant editor Lauren Wingenroth. "It's a super-easy one if you need something in a pinch—use an old ballet costume that you don't care about getting dirty, and paint your face white with dark eyes. Fake blood optional."

Escoyne as Terpsichore (far left), next to Nijinsky's faun

A Balanchine look is timeless and doesn't require too much planning. "When I was getting my BFA, we all got really into Halloween and would have themed days for an entire week," says DM assistant editor Courtney Escoyne. "For 'Mythical Monday,' I decided to pull some inspiration from Mr. B and go as Terpsichore from Apollo: classic white leo, white ballet skirt, pink tights. It was easy to put together, plus I got to pretend to be an NYCB ballerina for a day."

Last but not least, Halloween is the perfect excuse to dress up anyone's baby who may be crawling around the studio. Suzannah Friscia, an assistant editor at DM, says, "My very first Halloween costume as a baby was dance inspired: I was a purple Sugar Plum Fairy with a sparkly tutu and a little wand."

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Most people 20 or older have some "memory" about CATS, whether they were veteran theatergoers, saw a production as a child, donned a unitard for a middle school play or wore out the 1998 VHS recording. While this staple of the 80s and 90s captivated many, somehow I escaped the feline phenomenon—until this week when I saw the Broadway remount with Dance Magazine's "On Broadway" columnist, Sylviane Gold.

Aside from knowing a few of Andrew Lloyd Webber's famous show tunes, I went in blind, albeit a bit biased since I'm more of a dog person. I'll admit it: I was totally skeptical. What could be so great about humans dressed in fur frolicking around a trash heap? Well, a lot of things. These are the top seven that stuck in my mind after the show. 

1. First things first: There's no denying there aren't creepy moments of the show. Even the pairing of Webber's atonal music with cat eyes intermittently glowing in the opening scene gave me the heebie-jeebies.

2. It took some coaxing to get me on board for the first few numbers, but the party really started once Rum Tum Tugger had his moment in the spotlight. Played by Tyler Hanes, the flamboyant, electrifying rock star of a cat reminded me of Elvis, 80s hair bands and David Bowie rolled into one.

3. The next showstopper, "Mungojerrie and Rumpelteazer," a tune about two cat burglars played by Jess LeProtto and Shonica Gooden, was even more infectious. They were charming, funny and, boy, could they dance. Every body part from their eyes to their toes moved in satisfying syncopation, and their partnering had the finesse of acrobats. I could have watched a whole show about that pair.

4. Throughout the evening, it was impossible to miss New York City Ballet soloist Georgina Pazcoguin as the white cat, Victoria. Of course, she was graceful, and that's exactly who Victoria is. But I was drawn to the tension visibly coursing through Pazcoguin's body, capturing the musculature of a feline.

5. Although I didn't have much of an emotional reaction to the show as a whole (probably because it's structured as a series of vignettes instead of an intricate narrative), "Gus the Theatre Cat" yanked at my heartstrings. When Gus reminisces about his glory days as an actor and how he still identifies with that part of himself, I found myself reflecting on the fleeting careers of dancers, but also the notion that one is always a dancer even after their performing days are done.

6. A much younger cat, Mistoffelees, was just plain fun. "So You Think You Can Dance" winner Ricky Ubeda was not only charismatic, but his contemporary training, evidenced by tilts and (flawless) fouettés, added to the magic.

7. Overall, I was most impressed that dancing was packed into nearly every second of CATS. Andy Blankenbuehler's choreography based on Gillian Lynne's original movement made up the bulk of the show. I relished the lengthy dance breaks full of crisp, jazzy technique that's nowhere near as prominent on Broadway as it was in the 80s. The singing was fantastic, but every member of the cast had to be a rock-solid dancer.

Even though I'm still not entirely confident I know what a Jellicle cat is, I must admit that I'm now a CATS convert. Sure, the show is kooky, but it's a surefire sign that Broadway's danciest days aren't behind us.

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Inside DM

A recent staging of CATS in London. Courtesy O&M Co.

When CATS opened on Broadway in 1982, it ran for a record-breaking 18 years. This summer, it will return under the guidance of much of the original team: composer Andrew Lloyd Webber, scenic and costume designer John Napier and director Trevor Nunn. The major change for this revival is the choreography. Andy Blankenbuehler will base CATS’ new moves on the original ones by Gillian Lynne. Can Blankenbuehler pull off another Hamilton-sized hit? CATS starts previews on July 14, and opens August 2. 

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