Dancers & Companies
PC Lindsay Thomas

Leta Biasucci is one of those dancers whose presence seems to attract the audience's eye with magnetic force. The Pacific Northwest Ballet soloist's seemingly impossible buoyancy and fiery spark have carved her out a place in a wide spectrum of roles, uninhibited by her small stature and natural inclination towards the soubrette.

We caught up with her for our "Spotlight" series:

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Dancers & Companies

If you're at all like me, the key to getting through Mondays (in addition to copious amounts of coffee) is music. And thanks to Pacific Northwest Ballet, I've got my new #MondayMotivation mix all set.

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Dancers & Companies
Lindsay Thomas for Pointe

Lindsi Dec is one of the pillars of Pacific Northwest Ballet: From Balanchine to Wheeldon, her mastery of principal roles brings a dynamic spark, strength and expansive spirit to the stage. Last year in January, Dec took on the biggest role of her life when she and husband Karel Cruz (also a principal with PNB) welcomed their son, Koan Dec Cruz.

Now back on stage and rehearsing for PNB's first rep of the season, Dec spoke with Dance Magazine about the powerful ways that becoming a mother has influenced her dancing.

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Popular
Michelle Dorrance and Nicholas Van Young's "Works & Process Rotunda Project" at the Guggenheim Museum, PC Matthew Murphy

It's time! You submitted your nominations for the most memorable dance you saw this year. We narrowed down our favorites, and now it's up to you to decide what will make it into our December issue.

Voting will be open until September 25th. Only one submission per person will be counted.

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Popular
Seth Orza in William Forsythe's in the middle, somewhat elevated. Photo by Angela Sterling, Courtesy PNB.

Somewhere between Pacific Northwest Ballet's fall 2015 production of Kiyon Gaine's Sum Stravinsky and its winter 2016 Romeo et Juliette, Seth Orza completely changed his look: from a strong, commanding presence to a lanky, impetuous boy.

"For Romeo, I wanted to seem more youthful," says Orza. "I'm 6 feet, and I wanted to lose about 10 pounds."

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Training
Tiler Peck and Joaquin De Luz in Dances at a Gathering. Photo by Paul Kolnik, courtesy NYCB

All dancers work hard to hone technical skills and master thrilling moves. Musical dancers, however, offer something more. Their daring play with rhythm and their completely present reactions to the score make for bold performances that are mesmerizing to watch.

But how can performers learn to let music drive the dance? We asked some of today's most musical dancers how they do it.

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Dancers & Companies

A long time ago, I was a teenager, just hired as a member of the corps with New York City Ballet. I found myself standing in B-plus at the very back corner of the State Theater stage, clutching the hand of fellow teenage corps member Shawn Stevens. Though the expansive stage was filled with dozens of talented dancers, I was most awed by the two who stood front and center: Suzanne Farrell and Peter Martins. With a sudden and sweeping downbeat from maestro Robert Irving, the full power of Balanchine and Tchaikovsky flooded the stage and the final triumphant moments of "Diamonds" began.

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Training
PC Kyle Froman, Courtesy Ailey

Attending the right summer intensive at the right time can be life-changing—and potentially career-launching. But it's up to you to make the most of the experience. From building your technique to trying new styles to expanding your network, getting everything you want from an intensive takes focus and planning. Strategize for success with these tips from five professional dancers looking back on what they wish they'd done differently during their own summer study years.

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