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Photo by British Broadcasting Corporation and Polunin Ltd., Courtesy Sundance Selects.

Sergei Polunin has a penchant for unexpectedly bursting into the news. Since DANCER, a feature-length documentary that proved to be a sympathetic portrait of ballet's favorite bad boy, he's been increasingly visible, popping up everywhere from "So You Think You Can Dance?" to Sadler's Wells. So what's the international star got next on his dance card?

Teaching a Master Class

Some very lucky ballet students will be taking class with Polunin at Danceworks London on July 18. (It's currently sold out, but interested students can add their names to a wait list.) It was announced this spring that Polunin would team up with the studio for a scholarship to its summer dance program, the Sergei Polunin Inspiration Scholarship, which has since been awarded to two young dancers.

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It's hard not to resent Sergei Polunin a little bit. After walking away from his principal position at The Royal Ballet at age 23, frustrated—as he later told Dance Magazine—by the lack of support, money and exposure he was getting as a ballet dancer, now it looks like he's having his cake and eating it, too.

Polunin modeling Marc Jacobs for Numéro Homme

Not only is Polunin dancing again—under Igor Zelensky in Munich's Bayeriches Staatballett, and with girlfriend Natalia Osipova in her program of contemporary works—but he's also getting the Hollywood attention (and paycheck) he's always wanted.

In addition to starring of his own bio-doc, Dancer, Polunin recently confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter that he'll be appearing in two major upcoming movies: the spy thriller Red Sparrow, featuring Jennifer Lawrence (who plays a ballerina-turned-Russian spy who falls for a CIA officer) and the whodunit classic Murder on the Orient Express starring Johnny Depp, Penelope Cruz and Judi Dench. For now, Polunin's roles in both movies are unknown. But we're keeping our fingers crossed they include some dancing.

Don't let yourself get too bitter. Sure, he's landed numerous priceless opportunities in spite (or maybe because) of his "bad boy" reputation. But watching Dancer, you realize he's struggled the same as every aspiring dancer. What's more, he's determined to give back: He says his new Project Polunin is designed to be a company to support other dancers by setting them up with resources like scholarship funds, lawyers looking out for their interests and agents who can connect them with other industries—like film.

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Love him or hate him, it's hard not to be intrigued by Sergei Polunin. When someone with that much talent quits The Royal Ballet to become part-owner of a tattoo parlor, only to then star in a splashy David LaChapelle-directed viral video and start dating fellow ballet wunderkind Natalia Osipova, you can't help asking, What's going on with this guy?

A new documentary about Polunin's troubled path, Dancer, comes out both in theaters and on demand this Friday, September 16. The sympathetic portrait sheds some light on the forces that led to his conflicted love-hate relationship with ballet. Fresh off his So You Think You Can Dance appearance earlier this week, Polunin sat down with Dance Magazine to talk about the film—and why he keeps dancing today.

What's it like to watch a documentary about yourself?

I didn't want to see it. But I was hanging out with David LaChapelle in LA, and he was like, Oh, we're going to watch it tonight with some other dancers. I had like nine beers. I was sitting next to him, squashing his leg. It was really intense. I wanted to see myself from an outside eye, but you can't really, because it triggers something raw inside of you.

Footage from boyhood

Had you seen all that old dance footage?

No—I didn't even remember that my mom had a camera! It was such a strange thing for her to do.

Does the film feel like an accurate depiction?

It's really real. It's a human story. Rather than digging into one thing, it had many layers. I want dancers to see it. It shows how much a dance career takes for parents, too.

In the film, you say you considered "Take Me To Church" your goodbye to dance. What made you continue?

Well, at that point I did not like dancing; I was upset with the industry. You know, footballers and actors get so much money, have so much exposure and I don't think dancers are less talented, and if anything, they work much, much harder. But you don't get that same reward. So I was really upset. I had to decide if I wanted to stay in L.A. and become an actor.

Filming "Take Me To Church" took nine hours. And to open myself up for this piece, I got very empty, like really emotional. It gave me nine hours of just thinking about what I'm leaving behind. I felt really sad. Then I saw David and how much he loved dance, and I thought, This is strange, maybe I'm missing something.

A rehearsal scene in Dancer

After that shoot, I got strength back to do something. I went back to Russia, and told Igor Zelensky at Stanislavsky Ballet that I don't want to get paid, I just want to do it for the love of dance. I had to understand that I liked doing it for that reason rather than for anything else.

Igor is now director at Bayerisches Staatsballet, and has made you a "permanent guest artist." How much will you be dancing there?

Whenever I'm free. I was lucky to have Igor to come back to when I was traveling to America to try other things, search for things. It's like a cushion.

What inspired you to start Project Polunin?

Talking to David, I realized every other industry has support—agents and managers. You give a small percentage, but you gain protection, knowledge, connection. Most dancers don't have that. And there are sharks who'll use you. So we built a company to support dancers called Project Polnuin. It's so many angels—bankers, lawyers donating their time, we have a board to develop a structure, and we'll connect dancers with other industries like fashion, movies, music. We want every dancer to join it. We're just at the beginning of the journey.

When I left Royal Ballet, I had no one I could ask for an opinion. I didn't know what I was searching for. I wish I had someone who would say, "You should do that audition." "If you want to model, this is the company that will develop that." "What's your ability? How do you see yourself?"

Footage from the wings in Dancer

Do you think this film will change the way you're seen in the dance world?

When I meet people now, they're much warmer. I don't think any human is a bad person, they're just misunderstood.

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Polunin modeling Marc Jacobs for Numéro Homme

Ballet's favorite bad boy, Sergei Polunin, is in the limelight again. He's the subject of a new bio-doc, called DANCER. The international trailer was just released this week, and it's as dramatic as you'd expect.

Fittingly, the background music is none other than Hozier's Take Me To Church—you'll remember the music video because it featured Polunin dancing like a wild man (and racked up almost 15 million views). The trailer gives us even more tantalizing glimpses of Polunin dancing—in the studio as a kid with unbelievably beautiful lines, onstage as a professional with unbelievably high jumps, at home goofing around with unbelievably endless turns. It also hints at his tortured backstory, and how he grew so disillusioned with dance that he walked away from his prodigious Royal Ballet career at only 25.

(There's also plenty of shirtless footage to check out his many tattoos.)

Screen Daily reports that the feature-length documentary will be shown to potential buyers at Cannes before an anticipated fall festival debut.

In other Polunin news, he told The Guardian this weekend that he'd now like to re-join The Royal as a guest artist, presumably so he can dance more often with his girlfriend, Natalia Osipova. The pair will be performing works by Arthur Pita and Russell Maliphant together in a program Osipova commissioned herself, which opens at Sadler's Wells in London next month. We're keeping our fingers crossed it makes its way stateside. If not, at least it seems like DANCER has plenty of performance and behind-the-scenes clips of Polunin we can enjoy.

 

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Inside DM

Music videos are embracing concert dance more than ever.

It was the music video the world couldn’t stop talking about. Sia’s “Chandelier” featured “Dance Moms” star Maddie Ziegler moving with reckless abandon in a forlorn apartment. The video became the 17th most viewed on YouTube, and won the award for Best Choreography at the 2014 MTV Video Music Awards. After two more collaborations, Sia’s projects starring Ziegler and choreographed by Ryan Heffington have collectively garnered over a billion views on YouTube.

Though we don’t yet know who will take home a VMA this month, one thing is for certain: Dancers are no longer just a backdrop. They’ve become the heart of many videos, like in Taylor Swift’s dance mash-up “Shake It Off” and Carrie Underwood’s splashy “Something in the Water,” featuring the dancers of Shaping Sound.

Pop culture and dance have already come together in television, on shows like “So You Think You Can Dance” and “Breaking Pointe.” But music videos, generally with a three- to four-minute window, pack in only the most impressive movement. It’s a quick dose of culture packaged for consumption. “What we have been creating these past few years are products of evolution and sit in the confines of current culture. There is no chance I could have created this work a decade ago,” says Heffington, who has also choreographed for Arcade Fire, FKA twigs and Florence + the Machine. “The more people see dance in music videos, the more they can relate to it.”

But is boiling dance down to a few minutes of flash good for the art form? The success of a music video is generally determined by its director, says Jade Hale-Christofi, who choreographed a viral video to Hozier’s “Take Me to Church,”danced by Sergei Polunin. He says that director David LaChapelle’s understanding of dance helped give himself and Polunin the freedom to develop a powerful final product. “If it’s done right and it’s done with care and love for the art, more dancers would definitely go into music videos,” he says. “Anyone can look at it and understand the piece. And I think that if you can inspire enough people to watch ballet, that’s a great thing.”

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