There's nothing else we'd rather be doing than dancing.

13 Reasons Why Being a Dancer Is the Absolute Best

Call us partial, but when it comes to career choices, being a dancer takes the cake. It certainly isn't easy, but every moment we're in the studio or onstage, we get to do something we love. Here are 13 reasons why being a dancer is—in our humble opinion—the best thing in the world.


1. We wear sweat like a badge of honor.

Pit stains? Drenched hair? Soaked leo? It ain't a thang.


2. We have a license to bust a move anywhere.

Grocery store, don't care. I'm rehearsing.


3. Swapping toenail horror stories is a regular pastime.

Don't even try to out-gross us.


4. Netflix and chill foam roll is our jam.

Fighting DOMS is practically a part-time job. Delayed onset muscle soreness is very real.


5. We're masters of time management.

Class, rehearsal, perform, cross-train, side job. Who else can look this good doing so many things?


6. Shaving our legs in cramped quarters is no problem.

A smaller shower just means a higher développé. Hamstrings for the win.


7. We've got a sixth sense: spotting other dancers anywhere.

Turnout is a dead giveaway.


8. We're basically certified beauty experts.

After all that practice with stage makeup, shelling out beauty advice comes naturally.


9. Learning iconic music video choreography is a cinch.

Not to mention, it makes you an instant hit at parties. "Thriller," anyone?


10. We can rock a tutu and tiara like nobody's business.

No, really. It actually is our business.


11. We don't have to choose between being an artist and an athlete.

And it feels so good.


12. Most problems can be solved with a dance battle.

You'll be sorry you gave us the floor.


13. Last but not least, we always have an outlet for our emotions.

Or as Charlie said in Center Stage, "Whatever you feel, just dance it."

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Luke Isley, Courtesy Ballet West

How Do Choreographers Bring Something Fresh to Music We've Heard Over and Over?

In 2007, Oregon Ballet Theatre asked Nicolo Fonte to choreograph a ballet to Maurice Ravel's Boléro. "I said, 'No way. I'm not going near it,' " recalls Fonte. "I don't want to compete with the Béjart version, ice skaters or the movie 10. No, no, no!"

But Fonte's husband encouraged him to "just listen and get a visceral reaction." He did. And Bolero turned into one of Fonte's most requested and successful ballets.

Not all dance renditions of similar warhorse scores have worked out so well. Yet the irresistible siren song of pieces like Stravinsky's The Firebird and The Rite of Spring, as well as the perennial Carmina Burana by Carl Orff, seem too magnetic for choreographers to ignore.

And there are reasons for their popularity. Some were commissioned specifically for dance: Rite and Firebird for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes; Boléro for dance diva Ida Rubinstein's post–Ballets Russes troupe. Hypnotic rhythms (Arvo Pärt's Spiegel im Spiegel) and danceable melodies (Bizet's Carmen) make a case for physical eye candy. Audience familiarity can also help box office receipts. Still, many choreographers have been sabotaged by the formidable nature and Muzak-y overuse of these iconic compositions.

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