Broadway

Catch 42nd Street, Kinky Boots and 3 Other Shows on PBS This Month

Clare Halse Philip Bertioli in 42nd Street, Courtesy PBS

PBS' third annual "Broadway's Best" series starts tonight, and this year's edition is a treat for dance lovers. The 2019 lineup features five shows: three are Broadway musicals, one's a West End play and the fifth is a taping from The Public Theater's Free Shakespeare in the Park, with movement by a big-name choreographer.

Each Friday in November at 9 pm Eastern on PBS, you can experience a live taping of a different show—and the choreographic talents on display don't disappoint. (Pro tip: If you have the PBS Passport app, you don't have to wait a week between performances. Members can stream all five starting November 1.)

Here's what's airing:


42nd Street (November 1)

If your tap shoes have started to gather dust, 42nd Street is the musical that'll make you want to break them out again. This 2001 Tony-winning revival, making its U.S. broadcast premiere, features choreography by Randy Skinner.

Rodgers & Hammerstein’s The King and I (November 8)

Catch the star-studded cast of the 2015 production of The King and I. Not only can you watch Kelli O'Hara and Ruthie Ann Miles in their Tony-winning turns (as Best Actress and Best Featured Actress, respectively) but this version is punctuated with Christopher Gattelli's choreography, based on the original by Jerome Robbins.

Red (November 15)

In 2010, the two-man play Red took home the Tony for Best Play. This 2018 West End revival—about an artist and his assistant—brings the show back to life.

Much Ado About Nothing (November 22)

Last summer's production of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, filmed in Central Park, rocketed into the near future, updating its setting to 2020. And it has an additional cool factor: choreography by Camille A. Brown.

Kinky Boots (November 29)

The Jerry Mitchell directed-and-choreographed Kinky Boots is the perfect fit to round out PBS' "Broadway's Best." The celebratory, feel-good musical, with songs by Cyndi Lauper, will have you singing and dancing 'til year's end.

Health & Body
Getty Images

Nadine Kaslow, a psychologist who works with dancers at Atlanta Ballet, offers tips for creating a more body-positive studio experience:

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored by NYCDA
Ailey II artistic director Troy Powell teaching an Ailey Workshop at NYCDA. Courtesy NYCDA

Back in 2011 when Joe Lanteri first approached Katie Langan, chair of Marymount Manhattan College's dance department, about getting involved with New York City Dance Alliance, she was skeptical about the convention/competition world.

"But I was pleasantly surprised by the enormity of talent that was there," she says. "His goal was to start scholarship opportunities, and I said okay, I'm in."

Today, it's fair to say that Lanteri has far surpassed his goal of creating scholarship opportunities. But NYCDA has done so much more, bridging the gap between the convention world and the professional world by forging a wealth of partnerships with dance institutions from Marymount to The Ailey School to Complexions Contemporary Ballet and many more. There's a reason these companies and schools—some of whom otherwise may not see themselves as aligned with the convention/competition world—keep deepening their relationships with NYCDA.

Now, college scholarships are just one of many ways NYCDA has gone beyond the typical weekend-long convention experience and created life-changing opportunities for students. We rounded up some of the most notable ones:

Keep reading... Show less
Broadway

We knew that Ivo van Hove and Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker's production of West Side Story would challenge our preconceived notions about the show.

But a recent Vogue story gives us a taste of just how nontraditional the Broadway revival will be. Most notably, van Hove is cutting "I Feel Pretty" and the "Somewhere" ballet, condensing the show into one act to better reflect the urgency of the 48-hour plot. (The choice has been approved by the West Side Story estate, including Sondheim, who has "long been uncomfortable" with some of the "I Feel Pretty" lyrics.)

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored by Harlequin Floors
Left: Hurricane Harvey damage in Houston Ballet's Dance Lab; Courtesy Harlequin. Right: The Dance Lab pre-Harvey; Nic Lehoux, Courtesy Houston Ballet.

"The show must go on" may be a platitude we use to get through everything from costume malfunctions to stormy moods. But when it came to overcoming a literal hurricane, Houston Ballet was buoyed by this mantra to go from devastated to dancing in a matter of weeks—with the help of Harlequin Floors, Houston Ballet's longstanding partner who sprang into action to build new floors in record time.

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox