Klock in William Forsythe's Quintett. Photo by Todd Rosenberg, Courtesy Hubbard Street Dance Chicago

25 to Watch 2018: Alice Klock

Densely dimensional, unpredictable, strangely graceful and wild, Alice Klock's dances are like elegant ribbons caught in hopelessly tangled knots. In 2018, she'll choreograph more works than she did the year before, extending a trajectory that's continued throughout her still-brief career.


While her early premieres were in-house affairs at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, where she also dances, Klock is increasingly sought-after as a guest choreographer. She has recently added to her resumé the International Beethoven Project, Neos Dance Theatre, the Nexus Project, NW Dance Project, Visceral Dance Chicago and, later this year, Whim W'Him.

Hubbard Street asked the willowy wunderkind, now 29, to be its second-ever Choreographic Fellow beginning last fall. She and Hubbard Street artistic director Glenn Edgerton redesigned the position, orginated by Alejandro Cerrudo, to allow Klock greater flexibility in pursuing freelance opportunities while fulfilling her performance duties during her seventh season with the company.

"I'm excited to grow that position and to do everything I can with it," she says, while noting that her other two titles—dancer and (prolific) painter—remain just as important.

"Strangely enough, those three facets of my artistic self feel like very different beings," says Klock, who shares her artwork on klockonian.com. "Each of them uses its own part of my creativity, but they all perfectly triangulate each other, which keeps me balanced."


Find out who else made Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch" list this year.

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Courtesy Esse

What It Was Like When Ruth Bader Ginsburg Was in the Audience—or Backstage

The 27 years that Ruth Bader Ginsburg spent on the U.S. Supreme Court were 27 years that she spent as one of Washington, D.C.'s most ardent, elegant and erudite supporters of the performing arts. The justice, who died on September 18 of metastatic cancer, was also an avid cultural tourist, traveling to the Santa Fe and Glimmerglass operas nearly every summer, as well as occasionally returning to catch shows in her native New York City.

Ginsburg's opera fandom was well known, but her tastes were wide-ranging. Particularly in the last 10 years of her life, after Ginsburg lost her beloved husband, Marty, it was not unusual for the petite justice and her security detail to be spotted at theaters several nights a week. She saw everything, from classic musicals to serious new plays, plus performances that defied classification, like Martha Clarke's dance drama Chéri, with Alessandra Ferri and Herman Cornejo, which toured to the Kennedy Center in 2014.

To honor Ginsburg, Dance Magazine asked three dance artists whose performances the justice attended to recall what Ginsburg meant to them.

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