Alston Macgill in Peter Martins' Fearful Symmetries. Photo by Paul Kolnik, Courtesy NYCB

25 to Watch 2018: Alston Macgill

The most interesting dancers are the ones who aren't quite knowable. Watch New York City Ballet corps member Alston Macgill in Peter Martins' blazing Fearful Symmetries, and you might peg her as the kind of speed-demon powerhouse who's most lethal in contemporary works. Watch her as the high-flying third-movement soloist in Balanchine's Symphony in C, and you'll notice a grander, more majestic sweep to her dancing, an easy command of the stage that feels inherently classical. She's a natural "leotard ballet" dancer; she's a natural "tutu ballet" dancer. She's just a natural.


Macgill with Harrison Ball in Symphony in C. Photo by Paul Kolnik, Courtesy NYCB

Macgill, who has only been in the corps for a year and a half, has already built an impressive roster of roles. (In fact, she first danced the Symphony in C soloist part as an apprentice.) A favorite of choreographers, she has originated parts in Nicholas Blanc's Mothership and Lauren Lovette's For Clara. Look for her to expand her repertoire—and show us as-yet-undiscovered sides of her artistry.


Find out who else made Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch" list this year.

Latest Posts


Courtesy Ballet West

Celebrating 75 Years of Sugar Plum

America's oldest Nutcracker celebrates its milestone 75th anniversary this month.

GO DEEPER SHOW LESS
Alvin Ailey surrounded by the Company, 1978. Photography by Jack Mitchell, © Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation, Inc. andSmithsonian Institution, All rights reserved.

You Can Now View More Than 10,000 Photos From Jack Mitchell's Alvin Ailey Collection Online

From 1961 to 1994, legendary photographer Jack Mitchell captured thousands of moments with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Now, this treasure trove of dance history is available to the public for viewing via the online archives of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The collection includes both color and black-and-white images of Ailey's repertoire, as well as private photo sessions with company members and Ailey himself. Altogether, the archive tracks the career development of many beloved Ailey dancers, including Masazumi Chaya, Judith Jamison, Sylvia Waters, Donna Wood and Dudley Williams—and even a young Desmond Richardson. And there's no shortage of photos of iconic pieces like Blues Suite (Ailey's first piece of choreography), Cry and Revelations.

We couldn't resist sharing a few of our favorites below. Search the collection for more gems here.

GO DEEPER SHOW LESS
Getty Images

Our Wish List for the Next Decade of Dance

There are lots of gift guides floating around the internet this time of year. But the end of the decade has us thinking about more than presents.

As much as the dance world has evolved over the past 10 years, there's still a lot of work to do. So we started pondering: If we could ask Santa for our wildest wishes, what would we want to him to bring us in the '20s?

GO DEEPER SHOW LESS
contest
Enter Our Video Contest