25 to Watch

25 to Watch 2018: Annie Arnoult

Arnoult in her Dada Gert. Photo by Matthew Gregory Hollis, Courtesy Arnoult

Annie Arnoult and her Open Dance Project invited audiences inside Woody Guthrie's world in 'Bout a Stranger, evoking the Dust Bowl era through movement, song, theater and set design for a visceral experience of the great American songwriter's life. Arnoult's opus unfolded through vignettes occurring in makeshift kitchens, corridors and tiny stages that enveloped the viewer.

Her keen attention to detail, the timeliness of the subject (considering today's political climate of social action) and the superb performances by her dancers astonished on every level, making 'Bout a Stranger one of the most fully realized pieces to come out of Houston in decades.


The Houston native returned to her home turf three years ago to start Hunter Dance Center, a full-service studio, and Open Dance Project, the company that is now upping everyone's game in Houston. "We are an ensemble of makers," says Arnoult about her talented troupe, who double as actors, co-creators and set movers when necessary.

Arnoult continues to perform solo work with sound and visual artists. Her next big project, a restaging of her piece Dada Gert, will be presented by Rice University's Moody Center for the Arts and chronicles the life of dancer/performer and innovator Valeska Gert in Weimar Germany. And, like 'Bout a Stranger, it will be a completely immersive experience.


Find out who else made Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch" list this year.

Day in the Life

Most people may know Derek Dunn for his impeccable turns and alluring onstage charisma. But the Boston Ballet principal dancer is just as charming offstage, whether he's playing with his 3-year-old miniature labradoodle or working in the studio. Dance Magazine recently spent the day with Dunn as he prepared for his debut as Albrecht in the company's upcoming run of Giselle.

Dance Training
Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy Mark Morris Dance Group

You know compelling musicality when you see it. But how do you cultivate it? It's not as elusive as it might seem. Musicality, like any facet of dance, can be developed and honed over time—with dedicated, detailed practice. At its most fundamental, it's "respect for the music, that this is your partner," says Kate Linsley, academy principal of the School of Nashville Ballet.

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The USC Kaufman graduating class with Mikhail Baryshnikov. Gus Ruelas/USC

Just four years ago, the University of Southern California's Glorya Kaufman School of Dance welcomed its first class of BFA students. The program—which boasts world-class faculty and a revolutionary approach to training focused on collaboration and hybridity—immediately established itself as one of the country's most prestigious and most innovative.

Now, the first graduating class is entering the dance field. Here, six of the 33 graduates share what they're doing post-grad, what made their experience at USC Kaufman so meaningful and how it prepared them for their next steps:

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In Memoriam
Ross Parkes, right, teaching in Shanghai in 1983. Lan-Lan Wang is at left. Courtesy Lan-Lan Wang.

Notable dancer and beloved teacher, Ross Parkes, 79, passed away on August 5, 2019 in New York City. He was a founding faculty member at Taipei National University of the Arts in Taiwan, where he taught from 1984 to 2006. Lin Hwai-min, artistic director of Cloud Gate Dance Theater, said: "He nurtured two generations of dancers in Taiwan, and his legacy will continue."

About his dancing, Tonia Shimin, professor emerita at UC Santa Barbara and producer of Mary Anthony: A Life in Modern Dance, said this: "He was an exquisite, eloquent dancer who inhabited his roles completely."

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