25 to Watch

25 to Watch 2018: slowdanger

Knight and Thompson in their memory 4. Photo by Renee Rosensteel, Courtesy slowdanger.

Named for the road-sign warning, slowdanger, unlike its moniker's admonition, has been anything but cautious in taking Pittsburgh by storm. Founded in 2014 by Anna Thompson and Taylor Knight, who met while studying dance at Point Park University, the multidisciplinary duo have become known for their atmospheric, multimedia experimental dance works. Their cerebral approach and ethereal movement quality have garnered the two 20-somethings critical praise. In 2015, they received a Pittsburgh BRAZZY Award, chosen by Pittsburgh dance writers.


As much musicians as dancer/choreographers, they create original ambient music and soundscapes for their own dances and for others', which has led to a parallel career in the music industry.

In demand, the prolific pair has worked with a multitude of dance and arts organizations from Seattle to Vancouver to Paris. "We are trying to be like migratory birds developing collaborative connections between where we nest and the other places we want to be," says Thompson. Look for the "it" couple to branch out even more in 2018.


Find out who else made Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch" list this year.

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