Playlists

Alex Wong Shared the Playlist That Gives Him All That Energy

His musical taste is just as versatile as he is. Photo by Nathan Sayers for Dance Magazine

If you know anything about Alex Wong, you know that he's non-stop. The ballet-turned-commercial star is literally always dancing—in the street, in hotels, on tennis courts—and does some of the most mind-blowing cross-training workouts we've ever seen. Plus, we can't keep track of his many high-profile projects, and often find ourselves spotting him in our favorite movies and TV shows—from The Greatest Showman to "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend."

What we're saying is that we'll have some of whatever it is he's having. And it turns out that a hype playlist is part of the secret to his endless energy. Lucky for us, Wong shared his go-to warm up songs:


The Power of Good Music and Good Friends

"I was driving in L.A. and was stopped at a stoplight with my best friend. We were shamelessly jamming to "What Makes You Beautiful" by One Direction and it went "you don't know you're beautif—BOOM!" We had been rear-ended. We were in such a good mood that we looked at each other, asked if each other was OK and started laughing. Just goes to show what a good song and friends can do!"

Why He Can't Stop Listening to The Greatest Showman

"This is an obvious one for me as I was part of the movie. Each song holds a very special place in my heart. They're mostly feel-good songs and great ones to sing along to!"

Why His Keeps His Music Choices Simple

"My tastes in music aren't too deep. I like the typical pop bop that you hear on the radio. Dance-wise, I love things with unique beats or accents. I also love great singers with amazing vocal ability, as well as some great Broadway hits!"

His Favorite Underrated B-Side Track

"I feel like 'Honeymoon Avenue' is the best song Ariana Grande ever made. I'm not sure why she never released it as a single. I love the beat and it reminds me of my friends and I dancing like crazy people."

How He Finds New Music

"I like listening to the radio, or for more unique tracks, I'll find similar artists and go off on a tangent and listen to each song on their album."

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