GET IT, Janelle. (Getty Images)

All the Dance Highlights of the 2019 Grammy Awards

Yes, yes, it's a music awards show, but for us, it's *always* all about the dancing. And last night, the Grammy performers—especially the ladies—gave us everything our little dancer hearts desired. Happy early Valentine's Day to us! 😍


4. Camila Cabello performing "Havana"

There are definitely worse ways to open an awards show than with Camila Cabello's chart-topping song. Cabello joined forces with Ricky Martin, J Balvin, jazz trumpeter Arturo Sandoval, her own abuela (!), and a giant crew of dancers for a colorful, cannily choreographed performance that was giving us alllll kinds of West Side Story vibes.

3. Jennifer Lopez's Motown tribute

Lopez may have received some criticism for this performance—skeptics wondered if she was really the right artist for the job—but the dancing in the tribute was indisputably on point. (When Tabitha and Napoleon D'umo are your creative directors, that's pretty much a given.) Also, find someone who looks at you the way A-Rod looks at JLo onstage.

2. Cardi B performing "Money"

OK, yes, everyone's talking about that incredible pianist that opened the set. But let's also talk about Cardi's cadre of catsuit-ed dancers, who helped Cardi create a showgirl-style fantasy (and GIF-able moment after GIF-able moment) on the Grammy stage.

1. Janelle Monae performing "Make Me Feel"

Aka We're Obsessed with Janelle Monae, exhibit #9476. Monae absolutely slayed last night, thanks in no small part to her regiment of fabulous dancers doing Fosse-meets-Janet-meets-fembot choreo. (And yes, those iconic pants from the "PYNK" music video made an appearance.)

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These Pros Prove That It's Possible to Start Training Later

These days, it feels like in order to master the technical feats required of professional dancers, you can't get enough of a head start on your training. Younger and younger Insta-protégés knocking out quadruple pirouettes or showing off their extreme flexibility give the impression that spending those formative childhood years immersed in dance gives you a leg up in an increasingly competitive field. Right?

Not necessarily. Some of today's top dance professionals who began in their late teens or early 20s prove that stereotype wrong. Though the exception rather than the rule, these artists show that the path to success can start later.

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