What Wendy's Watching

Ballet Hispánico Brings A Reimagined Carmen to Harlem

Shelby Colona and Chris Bloom in CARMEN.maquia. PC Christopher Duggan

Ballet Hispánico returns to the famed Apollo Theater in Harlem with its full-length ballet, CARMEN.maquia. Spanish choreographer Gustavo Ramirez Sansano has reenvisioned the story of Carmen to emphasize Don José, the man who falls in love with Carmen, suffers because of her infidelity, then murders her in a "fit of passion." Their duets are filled with all the sensuality, jealousy and violence you could wish for—in a totally contemporary dance language.

Sansano's previous piece for Ballet Hispánico, El Beso, bloomed with a thousand playful and witty ways of expressing desire. He has a knack for splicing humor into romance.


He originally made CARMEN.maquia for Luna Negra Dance Theater of Chicago, where Sansano earned a 2012 "25 to Watch" as the new director. (The company has since folded.)

Ballet Hispánico is partnering with The Apollo with the goal of making dance accessible to a range of people. The tickets begin at just $10.

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