Maddi Bazzocco via Unsplash

The Best Cross-Training for Dancers, According to 12 of Your Faves

Today, dancers are cross-training more than ever. And though there are some recommendations about what types of cross-training might be best for dancers' bodies, ultimately it comes down to what works for you.

We asked 13 pros about their go-to cross-training routines as part of our "Spotlight" series—and each one of them has a totally different approach:


Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Jamar Roberts

Roberts onstage in a spotlight. He wears shiny silver pants and an open red track jacket with no shirt underneath. He also wears a red cap. He crosses one leg in front of the other, and has his arms to the sides, one curved up and the other curved down.

Jamar Roberts in Talley Beatty's Stack-Up.

Photo by Paul Kolnik, courtesy Ailey

"Yoga is a daily necessity for mind, body and spirit."

San Francisco Ballet's Sarah Van Patten

Van Patten in the party scene. She is in attitude, with one arm in fifth position above her head and the other in second to the side. She wears a pink long sleeved-dress. Other party guests meander around her.

Van Patten in Romeo and Juliet

Erik Tomasson, Courtesy SFB

"Gyrotonic all day, every day."

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Studio shots by Alinne Volpato

Jovani Furlan's Open-Hearted Dancing—And Personality—Lights Up New York City Ballet

Something magical happens when Jovani Furlan smiles at another dancer onstage. Whether it's a warm acknowledgment between sections of Jerome Robbins' Dances at a Gathering or an infectious grin delivered in the midst of a puzzle box of a sequence in Justin Peck's Everywhere We Go, whoever is on the receiving end brightens.

"I could stare at him forever," says New York City Ballet principal Megan Fairchild. "He's just that kind of open spirit. He's not judging anything. It's like he's looking at you with his arms wide open and a big smile—even if he's not smiling, that's the energy he's giving you."

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