Big Names Are Involved In The Rockettes' New Show

Last year, The Rockettes hoped to leap beyond a holiday-only gig with the premiere of a new spring production called Heart and Lights. But the show was abruptly cancelled less than one week before opening night. Madison Square Garden Entertainment said Heart and Lights, directed and choreographed by Linda Haberman, was not stage ready and postponed the show for a year.


Since then, most of us have been expecting to see a revamped version of Heart and Lights. But yesterday, MSG Entertainment announced that the production has been scrapped for a new show, New York Spring Spectacular, which begins previews March 12, and runs March 26–May 3.

That's not the biggest news though: Broadway vets have been culled to help ensure the production's success. Warren Carlyle (After Midnight) is the new director/choreographer and Diane Paulus (Pippin) and Randy Weiner (Queen of the Night, Sleep No More) are co-directors. Harvey Weinstein, who as an unofficial collaborator first raised concerns about Heart and Lights last year, is co-producing the show with MSG. Longtime Rockettes director Linda Haberman is no longer affiliated with the troupe. It is unclear whether she has stepped down or been fired.


Scrapping Heart and Lights resulted in a big loss—the show cost $25 million. But New York Spring Spectacular will retool many of the already built props and sets. Like Heart and Lights, its storyline follows New Yorkers as they explore the city. A preview of the show, below, has been released, with commentary from its new creative cast.

 

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