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What You Should Read in 2019, According to Your Favorite Dancers

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Made a resolution to read more books this year? Or maybe just looking for a new source of fuel for your artistry? We asked eight dancers about their favorite books in our Spotlight series, and their answers ranged from cheeky novels to biographies to cookbooks.

So whip out your library card (or your Kindle) and dive into the books that inspire these artists:


Dutch National Ballet's Michaela DePrince 

Via Amazon; Angela Sterling via dnb.org

The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle: "This book has helped me with so many things, like who I want to be as an artist."

Commercial choreographer James Alsop

Via Amazon; via Facebook

A Day Late and A Dollar Short by Terry McMillan: "I have probably read it 6000 times."

Tap dancer and choreographer Caleb Teicher

Sally Cohn, courtesy Richard Kornberg & Associates; via Goodreads

Deep in A Dream by James Gavin: "I love reading biographies and learning how people became the humans/artists we know them to be."

The Washington Ballet's Ashley Murphy

Via Amazon; Theo Kossenas

Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls: "It's been my fave since I was a kid!"

B-girl and choreographer Ephrat Asherie

Christopher Duggan; via Amazon

Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl: "I read it once every two years or so."

Pacific Northwest Ballet's Leta Biasucci

Lindsay Thomas; via Amazon

Where'd You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple: "She is a brilliant and hilarious Seattle author."

Martha Graham Dance Company's PeiJu Chien-Pott

Via Pinterest; via NYC Dance Project

The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer: "The book is so useful—there's not only recipes but Western dining etiquette which is fascinating for me."

Miami City Ballet's Nathalia Arja

Via Wikipedia; Alexander Iziliaev

The Shack by William P. Young: "I'm always recommending it to people."

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