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Breaking Gets One Step Closer to the 2024 Olympics

Is dance a sport? Should it be in the Olympics? They're complicated questions that tend to spark heated debate. But many dance fans will be excited to hear that breaking (please don't call it breakdancing) has been provisionally added to the program for the 2024 Summer Olympic Games in Paris.


The announcement was made yesterday. While a final decision won't happen until December 2020, the search for an Olympic breaking venue is now officially on.

Breaking made its Youth Olympic debut last October, when a talented group of teenage dancers competed at the Buenos Aires Youth Summer Games. Judges evaluated competitors using six criteria: creativity, personality, technique, variety, performativity, and musicality. The U.S. didn't send any dancer-athletes to that event (too bad, because we've got fantastic young b-girls and b-boys in spades); gold medals went to Sergei "Bumblebee" Chernyshev of Russia and Ramu Kawai of Japan. Assuming breaking does get all the way to the 2024 Olympics, we're eager to see which dancers end up representing the States.

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TaraMarie Perri in tree pose at Storm King Art Center. Photo by Sophie Kuller, Courtesy Perri

5 Self-Soothing Exercises You Can Do to Calm Your Anxiety

Physical stillness can be one of the hardest things to master in dance. But stillness in the bigger sense—like when your career and life are on hold—goes against every dancers' natural instincts.

"Dancers are less comfortable with stillness and change than most," says TaraMarie Perri, founder and director of Perri Institute for Mind and Body and Mind Body Dancer. "Through daily discipline, we are trained to move through space and are attracted to forward momentum. Simply put, dancers are far more comfortable when they have a sense of control over the movements and when life is 'in action.' "

To regain that sense of control, and soothe some of the anxiety most of us are feeling right now, it helps to do what we know best: Get back into our bodies. Certain movements and shapes can help ground us, calm our nervous system and bring us into the present.

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