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Breaking Gets One Step Closer to the 2024 Olympics

Is dance a sport? Should it be in the Olympics? They're complicated questions that tend to spark heated debate. But many dance fans will be excited to hear that breaking (please don't call it breakdancing) has been provisionally added to the program for the 2024 Summer Olympic Games in Paris.


The announcement was made yesterday. While a final decision won't happen until December 2020, the search for an Olympic breaking venue is now officially on.

Breaking made its Youth Olympic debut last October, when a talented group of teenage dancers competed at the Buenos Aires Youth Summer Games. Judges evaluated competitors using six criteria: creativity, personality, technique, variety, performativity, and musicality. The U.S. didn't send any dancer-athletes to that event (too bad, because we've got fantastic young b-girls and b-boys in spades); gold medals went to Sergei "Bumblebee" Chernyshev of Russia and Ramu Kawai of Japan. Assuming breaking does get all the way to the 2024 Olympics, we're eager to see which dancers end up representing the States.

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Courtesy Ava Noble

Go Behind the Scenes of USC Kaufman’s Virtual Dance Festival

Now more than ever, the students of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance are embodying their program's vision: "The New Movement."

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, the dance world continues to be faced with unprecedented challenges, but USC Kaufman's faculty and BFA students haven't shied away from them. While many schools have had to cancel events or scale them back to live-from-my-living-room streams, USC Kaufman has embraced the situation and taken on impressive endeavors, like expanding its online recruitment efforts.

November 1 to 13, USC Kaufman will present A/Part To/Gather, a virtual festival featuring world premieres from esteemed faculty and guest choreographers, student dance films and much more. All semester long, they've rehearsed via Zoom from their respective student apartments or hometowns. And they haven't solely been dancing. "You have a rehearsal process, and then a filming process, and a production process of putting it together," says assistant professor of practice Jennifer McQuiston Lott of the prerecorded and professionally edited festival.

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