Dance on Broadway

From Balanchine To Broadway: Brittany Pollack On Her Carousel Debut

Brittany Pollack plays Louise, the troubled teenage daughter. Photo by Julieta Cervantes, courtesy DKC/O&M

Among the many delights of the glorious Broadway revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Carousel is watching New York City Ballet soloist Brittany Pollack make her radiant Broadway debut.

One of Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch" in 2011, Pollack plays Louise, the daughter of the two leads Billy Bigelow and Julie Jordan. She makes her entrance in the second act, dancing a solo ballet in an incandescent, shimmering yellow dress.


Her dancing shows the same expressive lyricism that regular NYCB-goers are accustomed to seeing at Lincoln Center. But Pollack has added a new component: She's now also acting, speaking lines that along with her dancing make the audience feel Louise's heartbreak and teenage yearning.

Pollack recently spoke with Dance Magazine about making her Broadway debut, working with old friends and making new ones.

What It's Like Dancing Justin Peck's Choreography

Pollack's debut is made even more notable by the fact that she's dancing choreography by fellow NYCB dancer and choreographer Justin Peck. "We've known each other since we were 14. And since he's become one of the resident choreographers at NYCB, I've danced in 10 of his ballets," says Pollack. This longtime friendship gave them both an immediate level of comfort.

"Her dancing has been a big source of inspiration for me ever since I began choreographing at NYCB," says Peck. "I'm always joking with her by saying that she is Tinkerbell to my Peter Pan!"

Justin Peck was nominated for a Tony for his choreography in Carousel. Photo by Julieta Cervantes, courtesy DKC/O&M

How the Process Has Been Different From Ballet

The biggest change to get used to has been performing the same role every night, says Pollack. "I have to find ways to keep my performance fresh," she says. She does this by playing around with her character, Louise. "Some nights I play her sad, some nights angry, some nights as a troubled teenager. I try to find a different motivation for each performance."

Becoming An Actress

Pollack's worked closely with acting coach Susan Batson, who also happens to be Nicole Kidman's acting coach. "She's helped me to explore the arc of my character, the free-spirited quality that she's inherited from her father, but also some of his darkness and confusion," says Pollack. "Kate Wilson, my dialect coach, has also been crucial in helping me, literally, to find Louise's voice."

On Her High-Profile Cast-Mates

"Everyone has been so down-to-earth and supportive," says Pollack. In particular, she says Renee Fleming, the opera star who plays Nettie Fowler, is always complimenting her after her dance sequence. And Pollack loves having NYCB principal Amar Ramasar in the cast. "We always warm up together before each performance. It feels like I'm back in the NYCB rehearsal room!"

Amar Ramasar plays Jigger Craigin. Photo by Julieta Cervantes, courtesy DKC/O&M

About That Controversial Scene When Billy Strikes Louise

In the #MeToo era, Carousel's depiction of domestic violence has become freshly controversial. Pollack offers her own interpretation of the relationship between her character and her violent father: "At first Louise isn't certain who this man is, he's a complete stranger to her. But as the interaction develops, she has a disquieting sense that this man is her father. When he slaps her hand, she is shocked and she rejects him. But later, during the graduation scene, she senses that this man is, in fact, her father and he's looking down on her and giving her his love. And she senses that her mother also feels Billy's presence. So, really, it's an epiphany for both of them.

On Costume Designer Ann Roth's Gorgeous Golden Yellow Rippling Dress

"Oh, I adore that dress!" Pollack says. "It just flows with me as I dance. And it's such a delight and honor to wear a costume designed by Ann. I feel like she pulled out all the stops for me. As soon as I put on the dress, I am Louise."

Rant & Rave

When the news broke that Prince George, currently third in line for the British throne, would be continuing ballet classes as part of his school curriculum this year, we were as excited as anyone. (Okay, maybe more excited.)

This was not, it seems, a sentiment shared by "Good Morning America" host Lara Spencer.

Keep reading... Show less
UA Dance Ensemble members Candice Barth and Gregory Taylor in Jessica Lang's "Among the Stars." Photo by Ed Flores, courtesy University of Arizona

If you think becoming a trainee or apprentice is the only path to gaining experience in a dance company environment, think again.

The University of Arizona, located in the heart of Tucson, acclimates dancers to the pace and rigor of company life while offering all the academic opportunities of a globally-ranked university. If you're looking to get a head-start on your professional dance career—or to just have a college experience that balances company-level training and repertory with rigorous academics—the University of Arizona's undergraduate and graduate programs have myriad opportunites to offer:

Keep reading... Show less
Dancers Trending
Alice Sheppard/Kinetic Light in DESCENT, which our readers chose as last year's "Most Moving Performance." Photo by Jay Newman, courtesy Kinetic Light

Yes, we realize it's only August. But we can't help but to already be musing about all the incredible dance happenings of 2019.

We're getting ready for our annual Readers' Choice feature, and we want to hear from you about the shows you can't stop thinking about, the dance videos that blew your mind and the artists you discovered this year who everyone should know about.

Keep reading... Show less
News
A still from Dancing Dreams. Courtesy OVID

If you're seeking an extra dash of inspiration to start the new season on the right—dare we say—foot, look no further than dance documentaries.

Starting August 23, OVID, a streaming service dedicated to docs and art-house films, is adding eight notable dance documentaries to its library. The best part? There's a free seven-day trail. (After that, subscriptions are $6.99 per month or $69.99 annually.)

From the glamour of Russian ballet stars to young dancers training in Cuba to a portrait of powerhouse couple Carmen de Lavallade and Geoffrey Holder, here's what's coming to a couch near you:

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox