This Studio in Brooklyn Hasn't Had Heat Since November. So It's Throwing a Dance Party

Dance artists, as a rule, are a resilient bunch. But working in a studio in New York City without heat or electricity in the middle of winter? That's not just crazy; it's unhealthy, and too much to ask of anyone.

Unfortunately, Brooklyn Studios for Dance hasn't had heat since mid-November, making it impossible for classes or performances to take place in the community-oriented center.

So what's a studio to do? Throw a massive dance party, of course.


The dance party, which will take place on Saturday, January 19, starting at 9 pm, has an "Outdoor Fabulous" dress code (no heat, remember?) and a call for donations to BkSD's emergency fundraiser. The studio has been attempting to raise $15,000 since late December.

Not only has the studio been unable to operate since November 15 due to the unsafe conditions created by the cold temperatures, but its landlord is also attempting to evict BkSD, which has resided at Cadman Memorial Congregational Church since the two organizations partnered to renovate its gymnasium into a studio in 2015. Per BkSD's fundraising plea:

In January 2016 we signed a 5-year Occupancy Agreement with Church Board of Trustees. Since then the Church Leadership has gone through a transition. They no longer want BkSD to remain at Cadman Church and have challenged the legitimacy of our original agreement. In the past year and a half we have dealt with sporadic lock-outs, eviction threats, and loss of heat. Our attempts to mediate with the Church have not succeeded and they are pursuing eviction of BkSD in Local Civil Court.

So if you're in the New York City area this weekend and want to get down for a good cause, head to 210 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn. You'll be braving the cold to help make BkSD warm again.

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