Rant & Rave
The power dynamics and working environments in dance can leave women vulnerable. Photo by Soragrit Wongsa/Unsplash

When an anonymous letter accused former New York City Ballet leader Peter Martins of sexual harassment last year, it felt like what had long been an open secret—the prevalence of harassment in the dance world—was finally coming to the surface. But the momentum of the #MeToo movement, at least in dance, has since died down.

Martins has retired, though an investigation did not corroborate any of the claims against him. He and former American Ballet Theatre star Marcelo Gomes, who suddenly resigned in December, were the only cases to make national headlines in the U.S. We've barely scratched the surface of the dance world's harassment problem.

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News
Dorrance Dance, a Fall for Dance favorite, will have their largest solo engagement to date. PC Julieta Cervantes

New York City Center just announced programming for the 2018-19 season, and we're frantically marking our calendars for all the must-see dance. This year is the venue's 75th anniversary, and they're pulling out all the stops—from the reliable fan favorite Fall for Dance to the most epic Balanchine celebration and more:

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Dance in Pop Culture
The Shelby gang...in tights? Why not? PC Robert Viglasky

If you, like us, have a thing for historical crime dramas and foul-mouthed British men, we've got great news: "Peaky Blinders," the BBC's cult favorite show following the Shelby family gang in 1920s Birmingham, might be getting the ballet treatment.

According to Deadline, creator Steven Knight recently said at a press event that the show will likely be continuing for at least three more seasons—and that British contemporary ballet company Rambert approached him about making a ballet.

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Dance in Pop Culture
Diana Vishneva is starring in a ballet produced by a former Trump aide. PC Svetlana Avvakum, Courtesy Vishneva

Just when we thought we could no longer be surprised by the headlines coming out of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, a New York Magazine report has our jaws on the floor.

The latest former Trump aide to be interviewed by Mueller is a man named Michael Caputo, who worked for the President during the campaign, but has since moved on to more artistic endeavors. Like producing ballets. For Diana Vishneva.

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Dance Training
University of Kentucky students travel to Arts Advocacy Day in DC each year. PC Dana Rogers Photography

There's so much more to the dance world than making and performing dances. Arts administrators do everything from raising money to managing companies to building new audiences. With the growing number of arts administration programs in colleges, dancers have an opportunity to position themselves for a multifaceted career on- or offstage—and to bring their unique perspective as artists to administrative work.

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Dance in Pop Culture
Photo via the Hammer Museum

While Solange was busy helping big sis Beyoncé give Coachella its best performances of all time, an equally compelling project was quietly circulating on Instagram:

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News
Kyle Abraham's Untitled America for Ailey. PC Paul Kolnik

Ever since New York City Ballet's interim leadership team took over from Peter Martins, we've been curious whether they'd get a chance to try their hand at programming. (It was unclear how much Martins had done before he retired.)

As it turns out, Martins left room for Justin Peck, Rebecca Krohn, Craig Hall and Jonathan Stafford to select two of the company's six commissions for the 2018-19 season. Their choicesKyle Abraham and Emma Portner—are surprising, and thrilling.

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News
PeiJu Chien-Pott in Lamentation, © Hibbard Nash Photography

Google's headquarters sounds like a pretty sweet place to work. But for dancers? Tech nerds (no offense) hovering over computers and algorithms doesn't seem like the most natural place for artistic exploration.

But the Martha Graham Dance Company is getting an opportunity to work with said tech nerds at Google's New York City offices, as part of a collaboration with Google Arts & Culture to explore some of the tech giant's latest projects.

The Graham Company—along with Graham 2 and Teens@Graham students—will be in residence at Google for two weeks, beginning April 30. Visual artist SoHyun Bae, media artist Tyler Henry, filmmaker Nancy Stevens and Google technologist Tom Small will also be collaborating with the dancers.

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