The Creative Process
Crystal Pite rehearsing at National Ballet of Canada. Photo by Karolina Kuras, courtesy NBoC

Crystal Pite is a busy woman.

While her company, Kidd Pivot, toured the globe recently performing Betroffenheit—its acclaimed collaboration with Jonathon Young and fellow Canadians Electric Company Theatre—Pite herself launched three productions at three of the world's foremost dance companies: Nederlands Dans Theater (The Statement, February 2016), the Paris Opéra Ballet (The Seasons' Canon, fall 2016), and London's Royal Ballet (Flight Pattern, spring 2017).

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News
Brian Brooks snaps a selfie with Miami City Ballet dancers. Photo by Alexander Iziliaev, Courtesy MCB

The inaugural choreographer in residence at Chicago's Harris Theater for Music and Dance has a lot of stretching to do. In the first year of his three-year tenure, Brian Brooks has worked with Hubbard Street Dance Chicago's main company and pre-professional dancers; advanced students from the Chicago Academy for the Arts; with street percussionists The Chicago Bucket Boys; his own New York City–based ensemble; and teachers from Chicago Public Schools. Next up is Miami City Ballet, which premieres the Harris Theater–commissioned One Line Drawn February 9–11, March 2–4 and March 17–18.

You've gone back and forth to Miami a few times now. How much time have you had on this project?

We did most of the work over the summer, plus two other short periods: one in January and one the week of the premiere. We're mostly finished, but I'm still editing, clarifying, shaping.

Brooks leads rehearsal at Miami City Ballet. Photo by Alexander Iziliaev, Courtesy MCB

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News
NIC Kay performs pushit: an exercise in getting well soon at the Dorchester Art + Housing Collaborative during Elevate Chicago Dance. Photo by Zachary Whittenburg.

Having spent most of the past 15 years in Chicago, I can confidently say that Elevate Chicago Dance was the most comprehensive celebration of the city's dance scene this century. A dozen events packed 10 venues for three full days, featuring the work of more than 150 performers, representing nearly 40 locally-based dance artists and organizations. Nearly all were recipients of Lab Artist Awards from Chicago Dancemakers Forum, or had been selected to participate in a Regional Dance Development Initiative that CDF and the New England Foundation for the Arts launched in partnership in 2015.

It was an occasion to recognize how vibrant and diverse Chicago's contemporary dance community is today, spurred in large part by CDF's Lab Artist Program, which awards to up to six dancemakers $15,000 each and will mark its 15th anniversary later this year. (Choreographers can apply now through February 6.)

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Career Advice
Sterling Baca rehearsing Joshua Beamish's Giselle. Photo by Frederick Charles, courtesy Beamish

At a hip-hop event in Dakar, Senegal, Onye Ozuzu, dean of the School of Fine and Performing Arts at Columbia College Chicago, noticed a move that looked familiar.

"I had just come from seeing Don Campbell at a festival in Colorado, where he was talking about locking and the way people used to point at each other," she says. "At this b-boy battle in Dakar, I remember watching the points happen, but they were all loose in the wrists. The dancers weren't pointing at anything specific. I remember thinking, Oh, that's what happens when you learn something off of YouTube."

As early as 2001, hard-core dance fanatics with digital-media skills—not exactly a huge group of people—could swap rare dance videos using peer-to-peer sites like Kazaa. But it was four years later on Valentine's Day that www.youtube.com went live, and a vast repository of hidden dance history began circulating worldwide.

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25 to Watch
Klock in William Forsythe's Quintett. Photo by Todd Rosenberg, Courtesy Hubbard Street Dance Chicago

Densely dimensional, unpredictable, strangely graceful and wild, Alice Klock's dances are like elegant ribbons caught in hopelessly tangled knots. In 2018, she'll choreograph more works than she did the year before, extending a trajectory that's continued throughout her still-brief career.

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Dancers Trending
Courtesy Heffington

Patron saint of queer quirk and founder of Los Angeles studio The Sweat Spot, Ryan Heffington first made headlines three years ago as the choreographer of "Chandelier," a music video for Sia starring Maddie Ziegler with a combined view count of more than 1.5 billion. Last year, Heffington both broadened his range and reinforced his brand, contributing to the frankly sexual short film for "Worship" by U.K. pop trio Years & Years, collaborating with director Spike Jonze and dancer-actress Margaret Qualley on a cinematic short to launch KENZO's World perfume, and reuniting with Sia and Ziegler for "The Greatest" featuring Kendrick Lamar.

But the most effective vehicle for his idiosyncratic creative voice so far might be the polarizing Netflix series The OA. Heffington's compulsive tendencies to choreograph facial expressions and give discrete actions priority over cohesive phrasing are well-suited to screen actors without much dance experience. Whether the show's second season includes as much dance as its first remains to be seen; either way, chances are good that Heffington himself will remain busy.

Read the rest of Dance Magazine's list of the most influential people in dance today.

Dancers Trending
Neil Sapienza, Courtesy NCC

It isn't every day—or year, or even decade—that a dedicated choreography incubator opens its doors. As founding executive/artistic director at the National Center for Choreography at the University of Akron, Christy Bolingbroke says, "I have an opportunity to locate dance in a research and development environment, and reinforce the fact that what a choreographer does is not all that different from a scientist in a laboratory."

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Dancers Trending
Henry Leutwyler, Courtesy NYCB

The first executive director in New York City Ballet's history is also the executive director of its home, the David H. Koch Theater. Which means Katherine E. Brown oversees a 141-person staff and an annual budget of about $90 million.

Under her leadership, NYCB has never been more accessible. It consistently puts out shareable videos and snapshots of the company's work to an online audience of more than a million, while partnerships with mainstream brands like Puma bring its otherworldly artists down to Earth.

"It's important we communicate how the company is forward-thinking, doing interesting things out there in the world, not just cloistered away at the theater," says Brown. "I'd like to think we're removing some of the obstacles people feel in accessing this art form, without affecting in any negative way the artistic vision of the company."

Read the rest of Dance Magazine's list of the most influential people in dance today.

Dancers Trending
Jon Lowenstein, Courtesy YBCA

Chief of program and pedagogy at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Q: How has your role evolved since joining YBCA five years ago?

"I bring a social practice ethic to performance. You could call me the architect of a program that connects communities to the work that we present."

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Career Advice

From dancers to presenters to directors, no one in dance is exempt from the task of building an audience. But keeping up with email, social media and other marketing efforts can chip away at precious time spent honing your craft. Add in the fear of coming across as vain or self-absorbed, and it can be hard to know how to begin.

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Career Advice
PC Mike Topham

Ever dream of having one of your dance videos go viral online? The experience may not be all that you expect. Four dance artists reflect on their sudden fame after their videos became online sensations:


Kirk Henning is a company member at Richmond Ballet. You've seen Henning and his groomsmen dancing for fellow company member Valerie Tellmann-Henning as a surprise at their wedding reception.

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Dance Training
Laurel Jenkins, Photo by Vincent Beaume

Efficient movement is easy to recognize—we all know when we see a dancer whose every action seems essential and unmannered. Understanding how to create this effect, however, is far more elusive. From a practical perspective, dancing with efficiency helps you to conserve your energy and minimize wear and tear on the body; from an artistic point of view, it allows you to make big impressions out of little moments, and lasting memories for those watching.

So much struggle and determination goes into your training that it can be difficult for early-career dancers to recalibrate their priorities toward simplicity and ease, says Laurel Jenkins, freelance performer and Trisha Brown Dance Company staging artist. "Your aesthetic might shift, and you might have to find new things beautiful." Mastering the art of effortless movement requires a new perspective and a smart strategy—on- and offstage.

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Inside DM

Built to last, Mark Morris Dance Group’s The Hard Nut returns December 10–18 for its 25th anniversary engagement, in the Howard Gilman Opera House at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. As gleefully irreverent as it is visually poetic and musically sensitive, Morris’ interpretation of The Nutcracker features, among its many memorable moments, gender-queer snowflakes and a Christmas party with no food, only alcohol.

Mark Morris and Amber Star in a performance of The Hard Nut. PC Stephanie Berger, Courtesy MMDG.

The Hard Nut premiered toward the end of your time in Brussels, as director of dance at Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie. Did you always intend to keep it going somehow, to bring it back with you to the United States?

First of all, it’s lasted for 25 years because it’s very, very good. Which isn’t to say that there aren’t dances which have lasted forever, which are terrible. But no. When I left Brussels I didn’t know I would receive all of the physical properties for The Hard Nut, but we got an incredible deal to keep all those sets and costumes.

The Hard Nut conjures many distinctly American pop-cultural images, like soft-serve ice cream cones, Barbie dolls and G.I. Joes. Did those visual ideas come primarily from Charles Burns, the cartoonist, or from you, or…

It came from everyone. I sent everything—the music, the wonderful E.T.A. Hoffmann book upon which it’s based—to the whole team: costume designer Marty Pakledinaz, set designer Adrianne Lobel, lighting designer James F. Ingalls, and Charles. All of us together created this world. I can’t really say which ideas belonged to whom.

You’ve said the desire to choreograph The Nutcracker goes back to when you were a teenager. Is there a production which for you was particularly inspiring?

Balanchine’s is very good, even though the first act is kind of boring. People will kill me for saying that. My favorite is probably The Nutcracker Suite—it’s not the full Nutcracker—from Disney’s Fantasia. It’s such incredible choreography, the animation is unbelievable, I love the musicality and just the imagination of it all. It’s miraculously good.

Many of the dramatic roles are closely tied to specific artists, perhaps most of all Kraig Patterson as the Housekeeper. Has it been difficult to recast any roles, or to watch certain artists retire them?

I’m not overly sentimental in that way. I don’t “see the ghosts of Christmas past” when I watch the piece. There’s a difference between history and nostalgia.

Children sing in the chorus for The Hard Nut, but you don’t use them onstage. Did you get any pushback on that decision?

No. I do what I want, and I did not want to work with children.

You’ve performed so often in The Hard Nut yourself. What’s that like?

Because I work with such extraordinary dancers, and because the music is so wonderful and so alive, it’s always very surprising and fun. I’m all about living audiences paying attention and watching living performers. That’s what I love. It’s also exhausting, of course, especially since I’m so old now. [Laughs]

It takes an extraordinary amount of cooperation between a lot of people, and a lot of alignment of politics and forces, for a production like The Hard Nut to become a reality. Did you—

Right. It couldn’t be done today.

—did you have that sense in Brussels, of a limited window of opportunity?

I always think that. I did a big production this fall that opened at Cal Performances in Berkeley, Layla and Majnun, and that requires an enormous amount of trust in me, and responsibility on my part. Once something’s opened and it’s been successful, everybody wants it, but the danger, the gamble—and the interesting part—is supporting something new. Speaking of which: I have to go now, and I’m stopping my timer to let you know that we spoke for 39 minutes and 16 seconds, not just 10 minutes. Put that in.

Career Advice

Site-specific performance presents unique challenges—but can be uniquely rewarding.

Third Rail Projects performs in New York City’s Zuccotti Park. PC Dariel Sneed, Courtesy Third Rail.

When Rashaun Mitchell danced with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, he yearned for an alternative to the isolation he felt onstage. “Many times, the experience as a performer in a theater was lonely,” says Mitchell. “The lights are blinding. You look out into the blackness and don’t see anyone’s face. The show ends, and you go back to your hotel.” The works Mitchell now creates and performs in collaboration with Silas Riener are frequently site-specific, offering an entirely different experience. Audiences are often integrated into the performance, and dancers rely on their instincts to navigate constantly changing environments.

Although site-specific works can be invigorating in their intimacy, dancers need to be prepared for the unique challenges they present. From performing in the elements to interacting with audiences who don’t behave the way you’d expect, site-specific work requires a fresh mind-set and a different kind of flexibility than performing onstage.

Don’t Get Too Attached

You might be used to spending weeks or months in rehearsal, fine-tuning one ideal version of the choreography. But it almost always helps to view your role in a site-specific work more like an improvisation, says Biba Bell, assistant professor at Wayne State University. “Once you take things out of a controlled environment, the elements can fall into flux and become unstable,” she explains. “The ground itself can be uneven, and there are often distractions.”

Mitchell says these “complicated, unpredictable conditions” are among the benefits of performing in unusual spaces. “When it’s set choreography and really well rehearsed, you can do it a million times with your eyes closed. Having some things remain outside your control keeps it fresh and new,” he observes. Each variation generates a different result and, over time, performing the same work for different audiences in different locations contributes to a broader understanding of the part that you play.

Biba Bell warns that nothing is certain in site-specific settings. PC Corrie Baldauf, Courtesy Bell.

Keep Your Distance (in Mind)

When performing in a theater, you’re responsible for projecting from the front row all the way to the back of the house. Depending on the venue for a site-specific show, your front row might be 2 inches from your nose—or 200 feet away. Be prepared to engage with a show’s environment during an audition, says Jennine Willett, co-artistic director of Third Rail Projects, which presents Then She Fell at the Kingsland Ward, a century-old building at St. John’s Church in Brooklyn. “Over time, we’ve gotten better at understanding what we want to ask people to do that might reveal their potential for being successful in this kind of work,” says Willett. In anticipation of having audiences of various sizes in different rooms, Willett might ask performers to practice presenting a phrase once as they would for a single viewer, then again as if for 100 people, and then again for 1,000 people. “It helps to think of having a ‘dial’ you can turn,” she suggests, “to draw the audience closer to you, or, to project outward more, whether physically or in how you’re using your voice.”

Mitchell and Riener agree. “When someone’s standing right next to you, you have a lot of power as a performer, and you have to recognize that,” says Riener, “although I’m drawn to playing with that volume as well. We might moderate ourselves to set a kind of decorum, but we also might want to be ‘the wrong thing’ for the space we’re in. Once I understand what people’s assumptions about a space will be, I often find myself wanting to turn those things on their heads.”

Go Outside—and Back in Again

Some artists bring their site-specific projects out of doors. From 2005 to 2011, Bell and her collaborators ran MGM Grand (Modern Garage Movement), through which “we’d take something on the road and perform it one to three times a day, for three to six weeks,” she recalls. “And we’d always have our costumes on—in essence, we were ready to perform anywhere, at any time.”

Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener prepare for every contingency when performing outdoors. PC Alex John Beck, Courtesy Mitchell and Riener.

Mitchell and Riener liken performing outdoors to going camping, and advise their collaborators on outdoor projects to come prepared for any contingency. Pack your bag or a small suitcase with all the footwear, outerwear and warm-ups you might need, and be sure to ask in advance what kind of dressing area or green room—if any—you’ll have access to. With a laugh, Riener adds, “It’s always definitely going to rain.”

He still enjoys performing onstage—as do many other dancers who’ve gone the site-specific route. Willett even says that, to some degree, being absent from stages makes the heart grow fonder: “Once you’re in the woods trying to hang clip lights and present a performance in a place that has absolutely no infrastructure, stepping back into a nice, clean theater with a light plot is so amazing.”

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Career Advice

Imagine that each body part that comes in contact with the floor is a foot, says teacher Ami Shulman. Jubal Battisti, Courtesy Shulman

Four tips to help you master floorwork.

As humans, we take pride in walking upright, on two legs. But as dancers, we need to feel equally comfortable off our feet, in that slippery space between standing up and lying down. Today, dancers of all kinds are expected to be fluent in the language of floorwork, however disorienting, intimidating or painful it may be. Often, success lies in figuring out what not to do; the dancer’s instinct to try harder or apply more effort may only hinder you. When you’re on the floor, less is more.

Forget About What It Looks Like

“In so many techniques, we think of dance as being shape-based, as opposed to being about moving your body through space,” says Sarah Chien, founder of Floor Friends, a network of dancers and teachers who gather in New York City to take workshops and classes. “In floorwork, you’re not going to find the answers by copying the shapes. What you need to be asking yourself is, ‘How can my body be accomplishing the task at hand?’ and not, ‘How can I make my body look like the teacher’s?’ ” If you are working in a studio with mirrors, try to ignore them.

Work on Flexibility in the In-Between Places

“It’s not what we think of in terms of balletic flexibility, or flexibility as high extension,” says David Dorfman, artistic director of David Dorfman Dance and chair of the dance department at Connecticut College. To roll smoothly and comfortably between positions on the floor requires many small, specific joints to be flexible, not just in extending away from the body’s core, but in folding toward it. “Folding is essential to floorwork,” echoes Ami Shulman, a contemporary dance instructor who has taught throughout Europe and North America. “You have to know where the joints are, and how they work. It’s important to learn how to make yourself small without holding tension. To sit on your knees and shins, for example, the calf muscles and quadriceps need to relax and spread.”

To gain flexibility in the joints, find a stretching position, like a lunge, and make circular movements around the joint being stretched, starting as small as possible, then gradually spiraling outward. This will help make more pathways along the floor available to you.

David Dorfman Dance. Adam Campos, Courtesy Dorfman

Use Imagery to Inform the Quality of Your Dancing

We spend so much time standing and dancing upright that those habits of coordination are hard to break. Try using your imagination to get through the challenge of making peace with the floor. “Sometimes I’ll use the image of a beach,” says Dorfman, “to encourage the idea that you’re able to fall, as if onto sand. Or the image of falling backward into a pool of water. You have to grow able to transfer those sorts of feelings into the studio environment.” Another trick is to temporarily think of whichever part of your body is in contact with the floor—even if it’s actually your hand, shoulder or hip—as a foot. “This has the power to rewire your intuition,” says Shulman. “I like to think of the floor as a partner,” adds Dorfman.

Learn Other Forms of Movement

Chien and Dorfman both suggest experimenting with dancerly martial arts, such as aikido, capoeira and qigong. If you’re attracted to the daring, athletic movement seen in parkour videos, for example, or in performances by South Korea’s Bereishit Dance Company, look for classes in the Flying Low and Passing Through techniques of Venezuelan dancer David Zambrano, which are becoming popular at festivals like ImPulsTanz. Shulman also recommends researching Bartenieff Fundamentals and the Feldenkrais Method, which can help you understand your preferred movement patterns. From there, you can expand your possibilities and find more choices. “Habits aren’t necessarily bad,” she clarifies, “but they are preferences, which you can override if they’re holding you back.” Break dancing, circus arts and gymnastics could also help you unlock gravity. “It sounds corny to say that floorwork is ‘a way of life,’ ” says Chien, “but it is definitely a paradigm for relating to the world, to other people and to the space around you.” 

Ignore the mirrors and explore how it feels, says Sarah Chien. Tess Deselle, Courtesy Chien

Don’t Muscle Your Way Through It

There are no shortcuts in floorwork. Unlike most steps on your feet, not everything can be slowed down when you’re working against gravity. At the same time, pushing yourself to complete the sequence faster won’t always work, either. It takes concentration and a lot of patience to tap into the kinesthetic feedback offered by the floor, and you need to organize your body and mind to make sure you don’t skip any steps.

When practicing a floor phrase, try assigning each action a number. Say that number out loud only once you’ve completed the action, and then move on to the next movement in the phrase. This will help you avoid combining or overlapping pieces that should happen on their own. David Dorfman suggests thinking of the energy and execution of floorwork as a chain reaction, or like dominoes falling one by one.

“Sequential movement patterning will distribute your weight properly,” says Ami Shulman. “Taking shortcuts is not efficient—you’re engaging unnecessary muscular effort. That will make your movement on the floor extremely labored, and you will not be able to use the floor to rest.” 

Tip: Wear long sleeves and pants so you can slide and support weight with other body parts, like your shoulders, elbows, shins and back.

Career Advice

The mechanics of arts administration have historically stayed outside the studio, with dancers responsible for doing the dancing, and little else. “There was a massive separation between 'church and state,' so to speak," says Uri Sands, choreographer and co-artistic director at TU Dance in Saint Paul, Minnesota.

But today, small dance companies seem less likely to lean on traditional nonprofit staffers and instead offer dancers secondary administrative roles. This creates opportunities for professional development, while giving dancers a greater sense of ownership in the company and full-time salaries as an incentive to stick around. Plus, companies get to keep the payroll small, and spend less time scheduling rehearsals around the dancers' third-party employers.

But are there hidden costs in turning dancers—some with little or no experience behind a desk—into staff members? “To some degree," says Sands. “With this generation, I think to straddle those worlds is much easier. Keyboard skills, for example: In 1980, that was something that needed to be taught, but, today, even 6-year-olds have them. Certain things we just don't have to supplement, training-wise."

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