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Coping With Bad Reviews

Have you ever been stung, hurt or infuriated by a cutting review? Or have you ever gotten a desperate phone call from a friend who’s trying to recover from a degrading insult that appeared in print?

Now is the time to get help in coping with such reviews. Come to a panel entitled “Protecting Your Passion: Surviving the Negative Review” tonight from 6–8 pm at Gibney Dance on Chambers Street and find out about a new service. The panel is co-presented by the Dancers’ Resource, a program of The Actors Fund (which, by the way, is merging with Career Transition For Dancers). Bebe Neuwirth, who founded the Dancers’ Resource to help dancers cope with injuries of another kind (the physical kind), will be on hand to explain the services that the Dancers’ Resource provides. The Dancers’ Resource coordinator Amy Wilder will announce a new service to help dancers around the country cope with upsetting reviews. Choreographers David Parker, Ann Marie De Angelo, Nia Love and Sam Kim will talk about the impact of negative reviews on them and how they’ve moved past them to continue their work. I will be moderating.

The panel is part of Gibney Dance’s Center Line series. For more information, click here.

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