Dancers Trending

Dance Against Cancer Gala

Tonight’s “Dance Against Cancer” gala, organized by Daniel Ulbricht and Erin Fogarty, offers an incredible array of dance stars: NYCB’s Ashley Bouder, Maria Kowroski, Tiler Peck, Robert Fairchild, Wendy Whelan, and Daniel Ulbricht; ABT’s Misty Copeland and Herman Cornejo; Ailey's Alicia Graf Mack and Matthew Rushing; and Lar Lubovitch's Clifton Brown.

 

Maria Kochetkova and Joan Boada of San Francisco Ballet are flying to NYC on the red eye, interrupting their run of Wheeldon’s Cinderella, to dance the ballroom pas de deux from that new ballet. And Lil Buck, the sensational Memphis jooker who was a 2012 “25 to Watch,” makes an appearance too.

 

To find out more, and to see a touching video about why all these dancers want to give their time and talent to this cause, click here. —Wendy Perron

 

 

The Conversation
Career Advice
Tony Testa leads a rehearsal during his USC New Movement Residency. Photo by Mary Mallaney/Courtesy USC

The massive scale of choreographing an Olympic opening ceremony really has no equivalent. The hundreds of performers, the deeply historic rituals and the worldwide audience and significance make it a project like no other.

Just consider the timeline: For most live TV events like award shows, choreographers usually take a month or two to put everything together. For the Olympics, the process can take up to four years.

But this kind of challenge is exactly what Los Angeles choreographer Tony Testa is looking for. He's currently creating a submission to throw his hat in the ring to choreograph for Beijing's 2022 Winter Games.

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Cover Story
Photo by Jayme Thornton

In a studio high above Lincoln Center, Taylor Stanley is rehearsing a solo from Jerome Robbins' Opus 19/The Dreamer. As the pianist plays Prokofiev's plangent melody, Stanley begins to move, his arms forming crisp, clean lines while his upper body twists and melts from one position to the next.

All you see is intention and arrival, without a residue of superfluous movement. The ballet seems to depict a man searching for something, struggling against forces within himself. Stanley doesn't oversell the struggle—in fact he's quite low-key—but the clarity with which he executes the choreography draws you in.

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