A panel at Youth America Grand Prix. Photo by Rachel Papo for Pointe

Can You Really Network With the Judges At Competitions?

At competitions, the people who are scoring you can be the biggest industry leaders in the room. But is there a way to network with them with these judges? Three top competition judges share their advice on how to do it in the most strategic way—and the pet peeves that turn them off.


Mandy Moore—The Dance Awards

Don't be afraid to be forward, suggests Moore. Photo by Lee Cherry, courtesy Moore

"When you talk to a judge, never ask, 'I did my solo to this song—what did you think?' Putting a judge on the spot can be awkward, and will do a disservice to your greeting. Introduce yourself and say thanks. If you have more questions than I can answer in a quick conversation, you can always ask how you can contact me. I tend to remember dancers who are forward in a professional, mature way."

Monique Meunier—Youth America Grand Prix

Don't bring your parent with you, warns Meunier. Photo courtesy Meunier

"If you've just taken class with one of the judges, ask for constructive criticism or for clarification on a correction. You can also ask us for career or training advice: 'I'm applying to universities; can you tell me about the program where you teach?' One pet peeve of mine is older dancers who come up to me with their parents or teachers. As a teen, you should be able to speak for yourself."

Chloe Arnold—New York City Dance Alliance

Ask an informed question, suggests Arnold. Photo by Lee Gumbs, courtesy Sillar Management

"If you get a chance to take class with your judges, prioritize your training. Class is where mentor bonds are built, and after class tends to be the best time to network. One thing that will make an artist take notice is when you ask an informed question that shows you've been paying attention to their career and their work."

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Yes, It *Is* Possible to Build Body Confidence As a Dancer. Here Are 6 Tips

It's true. Everyone's looking at your body. In performance, it's your instrument—which can do amazing and sometimes superhuman things. In an audition, it's really the only information that hiring directors and choreographers have about you. Then there are the hours of class you spend scrutinizing yourself and what your body is capable of in the mirror.

This constant focus can make it challenging to develop body confidence, says Dr. Toby Diamond, consulting psychologist for the Pacific Northwest Ballet School. "It's never easy, especially when you consider that we also value facility, like excellent turnout and perfect feet, beyond beauty, and both can be out of your control."

So how can you become resilient enough to accept all the judgment that comes with a dance career?

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