A previous lab cycle. Photo by Evan Zimmerman/MurphyMade, Courtesy RRR Creative

Why Broadway Dance Lab Became Dance Lab New York

Choreographic incubator Broadway Dance Lab has recently been rechristened Dance Lab New York. "I found the nomenclature of 'Broadway' was actually a type of glass ceiling to the organization," says choreographer Josh Prince, who founded the nonprofit in 2012.


Though the original aim was to "stand among the Broadway community and outreach to a diverse range of choreographers to explore something that might eventually appear on a commercial stage," it's grown to embrace dancemakers for whom musical theater is not the goal. "It was always a place to try new things," he says. "The name change is to invite more types of choreographers to come through our doors."

DLNY's signature lab cycles, which provide selected choreographers with a company of 12 dancers and one week of free studio space without expectation of a final product, will continue, alongside newer additions like mentorship initiative DLNY Connect and the Broadway Choreography Intensive. Future plans include genre-specific labs—say, a cycle where the company comprises tap dancers.

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Courtesy Ava Noble

Go Behind the Scenes of USC Kaufman’s Virtual Dance Festival

Now more than ever, the students of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance are embodying their program's vision: "The New Movement."

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, the dance world continues to be faced with unprecedented challenges, but USC Kaufman's faculty and BFA students haven't shied away from them. While many schools have had to cancel events or scale them back to live-from-my-living-room streams, USC Kaufman has embraced the situation and taken on impressive endeavors, like expanding its online recruitment efforts.

November 1 to 13, USC Kaufman will present A/Part To/Gather, a virtual festival featuring world premieres from esteemed faculty and guest choreographers, student dance films and much more. All semester long, they've rehearsed via Zoom from their respective student apartments or hometowns. And they haven't solely been dancing. "You have a rehearsal process, and then a filming process, and a production process of putting it together," says assistant professor of practice Jennifer McQuiston Lott of the prerecorded and professionally edited festival.

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