IADMS is looking to honor someone who's made a substantial impact through teaching dance. Photo via Thinkstock

Who's Your Favorite Science-Loving Dance Teacher?

Great dance educators with smart, scientific teaching practices are invaluable to the dance field. How else could we create healthy, beautiful dancers?

The International Association of Dance Medicine and Science is looking to honor someone who's made a substantial impact through teaching with its annual Dance Educators Award—and the committee is asking for nominations.


The award has been given to a dance teacher who integrates principals of dance science into their classroom every year since 2014. Past recipients include Janice Plastino from University of California Irvine, Janet Karin from Australian Ballet School, Tom Welsh from Florida State University and Emma Redding from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

What are the criteria? The committee is looking to recognize someone who:

  • demonstrates long standing support for the integration and implementation of dance science in the classroom
  • has developed a system of training based on sound knowledge of human anatomy, physiology and/or psychology
  • can address artistic and pedagogical priorities within a scientific context to help researchers understand the art of dance and dance teaching
  • demonstrates innovative thinking in teaching and is not afraid to challenge myths and historical methods
  • demonstrates an ongoing commitment to furthering the field of dance and dance science and IADMS as an organization
To make a nomination, fill out IADMS' webform by May 1.

The selected honoree will be recognized at the IADMS conference in Helsinki this October.

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