Dancers Trending

What These 9 Stars Would Be Doing If They Weren't Dancers

It can be hard to imagine life without—or just after—dance. Perhaps that's why we find it so fascinating to hear what our favorite dancers think they'd be doing if they weren't performing for a living.

We've been asking stars about the alternate career they'd like to try in our "Spotlight" Q&A series, and their answers—from the unexpected to the predictable—do not disappoint:


Martha Graham Dance Company's PeiJu Chien-Pott: Fashion Designer or Graphic Designer

PeiJu Chien-Pott in a Graham contraction while sitting on the ground, her legs extended up in the air with bent knees. She wears a tan leotard and her black hair is down and flowing behind her.

Yi-Chun Wu

"I enjoy compositing beautiful images and letting my creativity bloom."

The Washington Ballet's Ashley Murphy: Physical Therapist

Murphy as Myrtha in Giselle. She is in arabesque, with the rest of the willis in formation behind her, gesturing towards her with a subtle port de bras.

Theo Kossenas

"My goal is to become a physical therapist so that I can help other dancers feel and dance their very best."

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Jamar Roberts: Graphic Designer or Animator

A photo from a photoshoot of Roberts jumping in the air, his legs crossed and his arms reaching towards the ground. He wears metallic shorts and looks toward his right hand.

Andrew Eccles

"I also enjoy drawing and fashion, and designed the costumes for Members Don't Get Weary."

Health & Body
Gettty Images

It's a cycle familiar to many: First, a striking image of a lithe, impossibly fit dancer executing a gravity-defying développé catches your eye on Instagram. You pause your scrolling to marvel, over and over again, at her textbook physique.

Inevitably, you take a moment to consider your own body, in comparison. Doubt and negative self-talk first creep, and then flood, in. "I'll never look like that," the voice inside your head whispers. You continue scrolling, but the image has done its dirty work—a gnawing sensation has taken hold, continually reminding you that your own body is inferior, less-than, unworthy.

It's no stretch to say that social media has a huge effect on body image. For dancers—most of whom already have a laser-focus on their appearance—the images they see on Instagram can seem to exacerbate ever-present issues. "Social media is just another trigger," says Nadine Kaslow, a psychologist who works with the dancers of Atlanta Ballet. "And dancers don't need another trigger." In the age of Photoshop and filters, how can dancers keep body dysmorphia at bay?

Keep reading... Show less
Dance on Broadway
Courtesy Boneau/Bryan-Brown

If "Fosse/Verdon" whet your appetite for the impeccable Gwen Verdon, then Merely Marvelous: The Dancing Genius of Gwen Verdon is the three-course meal you've been craving. The new documentary—available now on Amazon for rental or purchase—dives into the life of the Tony-winning performer and silver-screen star lauded for her charismatic dancing.

Though she's perhaps most well-known today as Bob Fosse's wife and muse, that's not even half of her story. For starters, she'd already won four Tonys before they wed, making her far more famous in the public eye than he was at that point in his career. That's just one of many surprising details we learned during last night's U.S. premiere of Merely Marvelous. Believe us: You're gonna love her even more once you get to know her. Here are eight lesser-known tidbits to get you started.

Keep reading... Show less
What Dancers Eat
Lindsay Thomas

Every dancer knows that how you fuel your body affects how you feel in the studio. Of course, while breakfast is no more magical than any other meal (despite the enduring myth that it's the most important one of the day), showing up to class hangry is a recipe for unproductive studio time.

So what do your favorite dancers eat in the morning to set themselves up for a busy rehearsal or performance day?

Keep reading... Show less
News
Simon Soong, Courtesy DDT

When it comes to dance in the U.S., companies in the South often find themselves overlooked—sometimes even by the presenters in their own backyard. That's where South Arts comes in. This year, the regional nonprofit launched Momentum, an initiative that will provide professional development, mentorship, touring grants and residencies to five Southern dance companies.

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox