Ananya Chatterjea (here in Mohona: Estuaries of Desire) will be leading one of the conference's movement classes. Paul Virtucio, Courtesy Ananya Dance Theatre

Dance/USA's Pay-What-You-Can Virtual Conference Will Address Inequity and COVID-19

Dance/USA's annual conference is going all digital this year. And while you may have already developed a case of Zoom fatigue weeks ago, this is one online opportunity we're truly excited about.

Because artists can join from anywhere and attendance is pay-what-you-can, the June 17–19 Dance/USA Virtual Conference has the potential to reach far more people at a time when open conversation and resource sharing are imperative for our field.


The sessions couldn't be more relevant as our art form addresses racism as well as the impact of COVID-19. Preview some of the topics below, then register through June 12 at 5pm Eastern here.

  • Physical and Mental Health During COVID-19 and Making Work Environments Safe (moderated by Dance Magazine editor in chief Jennifer Stahl)
  • Dance Performances: Planning & Preparing for the 2020–2021 Season
  • Open Space: An Artist Connectivity Series. (This special edition will be presented by The International Association of Blacks in Dance, Sheffield Global Arts Management, KMP Artists and Dance/USA.)
  • Sharing and Making Dance Online in COVID-19 and Beyond
  • Addressing Inequity in Dance Now and for the Future (a two-part series)
  • Federal Advocacy During COVID-19
  • Addressing Climate Change, Business Adaptation, & Community Togetherness

Social activities and dance classes are also sprinkled throughout the schedule, and include a networking coffee and tea hour, a DJ dance party and a #Dance/USGay happy hour for Pride month.

Tickets range from $10 to $100 for three days of programming, and you do not have to be a registered member of Dance/USA to attend. (For those who are unable to pay due to financial constraints, email annualconference@danceusa.org.)

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What It Was Like When Ruth Bader Ginsburg Was in the Audience—or Backstage

The 27 years that Ruth Bader Ginsburg spent on the U.S. Supreme Court were 27 years that she spent as one of Washington, D.C.'s most ardent, elegant and erudite supporters of the performing arts. The justice, who died on September 18 of metastatic cancer, was also an avid cultural tourist, traveling to the Santa Fe and Glimmerglass operas nearly every summer, as well as occasionally returning to catch shows in her native New York City.

Ginsburg's opera fandom was well known, but her tastes were wide-ranging. Particularly in the last 10 years of her life, after Ginsburg lost her beloved husband, Marty, it was not unusual for the petite justice and her security detail to be spotted at theaters several nights a week. She saw everything, from classic musicals to serious new plays, plus performances that defied classification, like Martha Clarke's dance drama Chéri, with Alessandra Ferri and Herman Cornejo, which toured to the Kennedy Center in 2014.

To honor Ginsburg, Dance Magazine asked three dance artists whose performances the justice attended to recall what Ginsburg meant to them.

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