PC Marcus Branch

#DanceCrush: Why Teddy Tedholm Has Us Mesmerized

Teddy Tedholm stepped into the mainstream dance scene back in 2010, with a "So You Think You Can Dance" audition that was unlike any performance we've seen on that show to date.


After graduating from University of the Arts he began to produce his own work, including eleven:eleven, a vulnerable and mesmerizing full-length show that received rave reviews. Tedholm has also been nominated for a World Dance Award, and was a finalist in the McCallum Theater Choreography Festival and the Capezio A.C.E. Awards.

With a movement style that is anything but conventional, Tedholm has found a way to push aside the boundaries placed around what is "allowed" in the commercial dance world. His emotive and gesturally rich storytelling stems from an equally passionate creative process. "It can feel emotionally sacrificial in the moment," says Tedholm. "But in the long run, the truer I have stayed to my vision and to myself, the more fulfilled I am and the better received my work has been. Shoveling through the dirt to find the gold is tiring, but worth it."


Tedholm currently has his own company, tedted Performance Group, which is presenting the beginnings of a new work at Gibney Dance Center August 10-12 as part of a mentorship program with Doug Varone.

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Stark Photo Productions, Courtesy Harlequin

Why Your Barre Can Make or Break Your At-Home Dance Training

Throughout the pandemic, Shelby Williams, of Royal Ballet of Flanders (aka "Biscuit Ballerina"), has been sharing videos that capture the pitfalls of dancers working from home: slipping on linoleum, kicking over lamps and even taking windows apart at the "barre." "Dancers aren't known to be graceful all of the time," says Mandy Blackmon, PT, DPT, OSC, CMTPT, head physical therapist/medical director for Atlanta Ballet. "They tend to fall and trip."

Many dancers have tried to make their home spaces as safe as possible for class and rehearsal by setting up a piece of marley, like Harlequin's Dance Mat, to work on. But there's another element needed for taking thorough ballet classes at home: a portable barre.

"Using a barre is kinda Ballet 101," says 16-year-old Haley Dale, a student in her second year at American Ballet Theatre's Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School. She'd bought a portable barre from Harlequin to use at her parents' home in Northern Virginia even before the pandemic hit. "Before I got it, honestly I would stay away from doing barre work at home. Now I'm able to do it all the time."

Blackmon bought her 15-year-old stepdaughter a freestanding Professional Series Ballet Barre from Harlequin early on in quarantine. "I was worried about her injuring herself without one," she admits.

What exactly makes Harlequin's barres an at-home must-have, and hanging on to a chair or countertop so risky? Here are five major differences dancers will notice right away.

GO DEEPER SHOW LESS
December 2020