PC Marcus Branch

#DanceCrush: Why Teddy Tedholm Has Us Mesmerized

Teddy Tedholm stepped into the mainstream dance scene back in 2010, with a "So You Think You Can Dance" audition that was unlike any performance we've seen on that show to date.


After graduating from University of the Arts he began to produce his own work, including eleven:eleven, a vulnerable and mesmerizing full-length show that received rave reviews. Tedholm has also been nominated for a World Dance Award, and was a finalist in the McCallum Theater Choreography Festival and the Capezio A.C.E. Awards.

With a movement style that is anything but conventional, Tedholm has found a way to push aside the boundaries placed around what is "allowed" in the commercial dance world. His emotive and gesturally rich storytelling stems from an equally passionate creative process. "It can feel emotionally sacrificial in the moment," says Tedholm. "But in the long run, the truer I have stayed to my vision and to myself, the more fulfilled I am and the better received my work has been. Shoveling through the dirt to find the gold is tiring, but worth it."


Tedholm currently has his own company, tedted Performance Group, which is presenting the beginnings of a new work at Gibney Dance Center August 10-12 as part of a mentorship program with Doug Varone.

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Paulo Arrais rehearsing Agon with Lia Cirio. Photo by Brooke Trisolini

Fear of Reinjury Could Make You More Prone to Hurting Yourself Again. Here's How to Avoid It

It was Boston Ballet's first full run-through of its upcoming show, Kylián/Wings of Wax. As he prepared with a plié for a big saut de basque, principal dancer Paulo Arrais, 32, heard a Velcro-like sound and suddenly fell to the floor. He went into a state of shock, hyperventilating and feeling intense pressure on his knee. It turned out to be a full patellar tendon rupture, requiring surgery and an entire year off before he could return to the company.

Though his physical condition continues to improve, Arrais' mental recovery has also been challenging. "Treating your mind is just as important as treating your body," he says.

Feeling safe when returning to the studio can be tricky for any dancer. Some researchers believe a fear of reinjury can actually make athletes more prone to hurting themselves again. We talked to several medical professionals to understand why that might happen and what dancers can do to overcome that anxiety.

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