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#DanceCrush: Why Teddy Tedholm Has Us Mesmerized

Teddy Tedholm stepped into the mainstream dance scene back in 2010, with a "So You Think You Can Dance" audition that was unlike any performance we've seen on that show to date.


After graduating from University of the Arts he began to produce his own work, including eleven:eleven, a vulnerable and mesmerizing full-length show that received rave reviews. Tedholm has also been nominated for a World Dance Award, and was a finalist in the McCallum Theater Choreography Festival and the Capezio A.C.E. Awards.

With a movement style that is anything but conventional, Tedholm has found a way to push aside the boundaries placed around what is "allowed" in the commercial dance world. His emotive and gesturally rich storytelling stems from an equally passionate creative process. "It can feel emotionally sacrificial in the moment," says Tedholm. "But in the long run, the truer I have stayed to my vision and to myself, the more fulfilled I am and the better received my work has been. Shoveling through the dirt to find the gold is tiring, but worth it."


Tedholm currently has his own company, tedted Performance Group, which is presenting the beginnings of a new work at Gibney Dance Center August 10-12 as part of a mentorship program with Doug Varone.

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Courtesy Ava Noble

Go Behind the Scenes of USC Kaufman’s Virtual Dance Festival

Now more than ever, the students of USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance are embodying their program's vision: "The New Movement."

As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, the dance world continues to be faced with unprecedented challenges, but USC Kaufman's faculty and BFA students haven't shied away from them. While many schools have had to cancel events or scale them back to live-from-my-living-room streams, USC Kaufman has embraced the situation and taken on impressive endeavors, like expanding its online recruitment efforts.

November 1 to 13, USC Kaufman will present A/Part To/Gather, a virtual festival featuring world premieres from esteemed faculty and guest choreographers, student dance films and much more. All semester long, they've rehearsed via Zoom from their respective student apartments or hometowns. And they haven't solely been dancing. "You have a rehearsal process, and then a filming process, and a production process of putting it together," says assistant professor of practice Jennifer McQuiston Lott of the prerecorded and professionally edited festival.

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