David Hallberg and Natalia Osipova in Romeo and Juliet. Andrej Uspenski, Courtesy ROH.

David Hallberg Joins The Royal Ballet as a Principal Guest Artist

Yesterday, The Royal Ballet announced that David Hallberg will be joining the company as a principal guest artist for the 2019–20 season.

Hallberg is already a familiar face at The Royal. As a guest last season he danced alongside beloved partner and Royal principal Natalia Osipova in Sir Frederick Ashton's A Month in the Country and Sir Kenneth MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet. This year, Hallberg will continue to take on roles opposite Osipova. They'll perform MacMillan's Manon on October 15 and 19. On November 20, Hallberg will make his Royal Opera House debut as The Sleeping Beauty's Prince Florimund with Osipova as Princess Aurora. And in March of 2020, he'll return to star in the company's first revival of Liam Scarlett's new production of Swan Lake.


Over the course of the past year, Hallberg has also toured with Osipova as part of her Pure Dance program, a curated selection of new works. "His [Hallberg's] partnership with Natalia Osipova is thrilling to watch and together they have a very special chemistry," said The Royal Ballet's director Kevin O'Hare in a statement.

"It's such an honor to join The Royal Ballet as principal guest artist and dance beside, not only a partner with whom I share a unique connection, but also a world-renowned company," added Hallberg of his extraordinary connection to the celebrated ballerina.

We can't say we're surprised that Hallberg is in such high demand. Since returning to the stage in 2017 after a two-year-long recovery process, he's been frequently jetting around the world to perform. Last month alone, he danced Giselle at La Scala Theatre Ballet and in Christopher Wheeldon's A Winter's Tale at the Bolshoi. While Hallberg isn't on ABT's fall season roster, we're hoping he'll be back for the company's annual Met season. In the meantime we'll miss seeing Hallberg on this side of the pond, but we're excited for him to embark on this next adventure.

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Paulo Arrais rehearsing Agon with Lia Cirio. Photo by Brooke Trisolini

Fear of Reinjury Could Make You More Prone to Hurting Yourself Again. Here's How to Avoid It

It was Boston Ballet's first full run-through of its upcoming show, Kylián/Wings of Wax. As he prepared with a plié for a big saut de basque, principal dancer Paulo Arrais, 32, heard a Velcro-like sound and suddenly fell to the floor. He went into a state of shock, hyperventilating and feeling intense pressure on his knee. It turned out to be a full patellar tendon rupture, requiring surgery and an entire year off before he could return to the company.

Though his physical condition continues to improve, Arrais' mental recovery has also been challenging. "Treating your mind is just as important as treating your body," he says.

Feeling safe when returning to the studio can be tricky for any dancer. Some researchers believe a fear of reinjury can actually make athletes more prone to hurting themselves again. We talked to several medical professionals to understand why that might happen and what dancers can do to overcome that anxiety.

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