DBDT in Nycole Ray's Above & Below. Photo by Sharen Bradford—The Dancing Image, Courtesy DBDT.

DBDT Wraps Up Its 40th-Anniversary Season and Welcomes a New Director

Finding the right person to take the mantle of a 40-year-old American dance institution is no easy feat. But when Dallas-native choreographer Bridget L. Moore agreed to succeed Dallas Black Dance Theatre's founding artistic director, Ann Williams, the company knew it was a perfect fit.


For Moore this is a homecoming. It was DBDT that introduced her to dance as a youngster when the company's arts-in-education program visited her elementary school. Although she lived and worked in Seoul, South Korea, from 2014 to 2017, she maintained a creative relationship with DBDT, which supported her in facilitating connections with dancers from Korea and the U.S. Last year Korean dancers performed in Moore's work as guest artists for DBDT's Spring Celebration Series, and in January she presented a piece featuring both Korean and American dancers at the DBDT-hosted International Conference and Festival of Blacks in Dance.


"It is my aim to honor the legacy, hard work and efforts that have been put into making Dallas Black Dance Theatre what it is today," she says. Exactly how do you move the oldest continuously operating professional dance company in Dallas forward? Moore has a very clear vision: "Through innovative programming, delivering new contemporary dance works and devising initiatives that attract new audiences." —Theresa Ruth Howard

40 Years Strong

Dallas Black Dance Theatre concludes its 40th-anniversary season May 19–21 with its spring performance series at AT&T Performing Arts Center's Wyly Theatre. A work by Ballet Austin artistic director Stephen Mills is the centerpiece of the season finale, which also features Twyla Tharp's Sinatra Suite and guest artists from Ballet Austin. —Courtney Escoyne


DBDT in Matthew Rushing's TRIBUTE. Photo by Sharen Bradford—The Dancing Image, Courtesy DBDT.

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Courtesy Harkness Center for Dance Injuries

The Mecca for Dance Medicine: The Harkness Center Celebrates 30 Years of Treating Dancers

When orthopedic surgeon Dr. Donald Rose founded the Harkness Center for Dance Injuries at NYU Langone Orthopedic Hospital 30 years ago, the average salary for a dancer was about $8,000, he says.

"It was very hard for a dancer to get quality medical care," he remembers. What's more, he adds, "at the time, dance medicine was based on primarily anecdotal information rather than being based on studies." Seeing the incredible gaps, Rose set out to create a medical facility that was designed specifically to treat dancers and would provide care on a sliding scale.

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