Emma Portner's Choreography for Maggie Rogers is the Cool-Girl Mashup of Our Dreams

Can Emma Portner get any cooler?

Between her existing credits (the youngest woman ever to choreograph a West End musical, that viral Justin Bieber video), her upcoming projects (a collaboration with Lil Buck, Jon Boogz and Blood Orange for Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and a commission from New York City Ballet, for starters) and the fact that she charmed virtually every major media outlet when she secretly married actress Ellen Page, one would assume not.

But then she went and choreographed the music video for "Fallingwater," the latest single from indie-pop darling Maggie Rogers, and all bets are officially off. Portner is capable of infinite levels of cool, and we're all just trailing along in her wake.


Portner has a knack for getting non-dancers to move in surprisingly impactful ways (just check out the Instagram posts of her dancing with her wife), and that proves particularly true here. Rogers goes non-stop through the first two and a half minutes of the video, dancing amongst sand dunes in an airy red jumpsuit.

It's groovy, awkward, ecstatic, cathartic—Rogers might not be a professional dancer, but armed with Portner's choreography she embodies the emotional undercurrents of the breezy track in a raw, honest way.

Rogers/Portner is the contemporary dream team we never knew we needed until now. Here's hoping there's more to come.

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