Your Guide to The Latest Ballet Podcasts

Barry Kerollis, Photo by Matthew Murphy.

The popularity of podcasts has exploded in the past few years. But did you know that there are podcasts made just for dancers? Podcasts are the new way performers are connecting with the audiences, experts are giving advice to dancers of all levels and conversations about dance are being made accessible to everyone. Which should you be listening to?

First things first—if you're interested in dance podcasts, Premier Dance Network is your go-to resource. The recently-launched network pools together dance-related podcasts, so you can easily get your ballet buzz in one place. Most recently added to the mix is Pas de Chat: Talking Dance, hosted by Barry Kerollis and just released on Friday. Kerollis, former PNB dancer and current blogger and freelancer will chat about everything from emotional health to choosing a dance show.

You may already know Ask Megan!, where New York City Ballet principal Megan Fairchild takes questions from fans and aspiring dancers, and answers her favorites every week. But do you know Becoming Ballet, another top pick for up-and-coming ballerinas? The podcast follows an early-career dancer throughout their day as they grapple with life in a second company, the pressures of an apprenticeship or landing that first company contract.


Megan Fairchild. Photo by Paul Kolnik.

Balancing Pointe targets a broader audience, interviewing various dance professionals about the role they play in making ballets come to life. And then there's a whole host of other options that aren't included in Premier Dance Network, like company-specific podcasts. (I recommend San Francisco Ballet's!) All of them can be found on iTunes or the Podcast app. So get downloading! Podcasts are a great way to expand your mind during downtime like your commute—or your pre-class stretch!

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