Justice Moore, right from center, in Hamilton. Joan Marcus, Courtesy Moore

Andy Blankenbuehler Discovered Her in High School. Now She's in Hamilton

June 3, 2016, was a big day for Justice Moore: It was her 19th birthday, high school graduation and the day she found out she'd been cast in the ensemble of Hamilton's Chicago production. Her controlled, versatile approach to movement, honed on the competition circuit, has only brought her more opportunities since then. Last summer, Andy Blankenbuehler chose Moore for a workshop for his new musical, Only Gold, and this March, she transferred her much-loved "bullet" track to Hamilton on Broadway.


Moore in a pench\u00e9, leaning against a support beam of a rustic, wooden building. She is wearing maroon leggings, a floral crop top and a black jacket.

Britney Holmes, Courtesy Moore

Age: 21

Shows: Hamilton productions in Chicago, on tour and on Broadway

Hometown: Allen, Texas

Training: Academy of Dance Arts and Next Step Dance, both in Texas

Accolades: New York City Dance Alliance top 16 senior female, The Dance Awards 3rd runner up senior female in Las Vegas

A black-and-white photo of Moore, in costume for Hamilton. She is lunging toward the camera.

Moore currently dances on Broadway in Hamilton's much-loved "bullet" track.

Josh Lehrer, Courtesy Moore

Breakout moment: Blankenbuehler taught a master class at Moore's studio and, a year later, asked her director if Moore could fly to New York City to audition for Hamilton. "I always thought that I would start out in L.A.," she says. "I was never really interested in musicals. As soon as I auditioned, I fell in love."

New terrain: Diving into the show gave Moore a crash course in musical theater. She learned how to manage everything from the lightning-paced rehearsals to vocal training to eight shows a week. "I had to learn how to call out. How to take breaks and be like, 'I can't push through this.' "

Meeting her idols: At the workshop for Only Gold, Moore found herself in the room with dancers like Peter Chu, Alessandra Ferri, Georgina Pazcoguin, Ricky Ubeda, Cindy Salgado and Ryan Steele—many of whom she'd looked up to or taken class from at conventions. "Now we were all in the same boat," she says. "I could not believe I was there."

What Andy Blankenbuehler is saying: "Besides being fabulous onstage, Justice has a maturity and work integrity that are far beyond her years. I trusted her immediately," says the Hamilton choreographer. "We will continue to cross paths for years to come."

Overcoming doubt: "Just graduating from high school and then doing Hamilton, I felt unworthy," says Moore. "It took me a while to get over that, and that's why I want to encourage anybody not to let anything hold them back."

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Courtesy Esse

What It Was Like When Ruth Bader Ginsburg Was in the Audience—or Backstage

The 27 years that Ruth Bader Ginsburg spent on the U.S. Supreme Court were 27 years that she spent as one of Washington, D.C.'s most ardent, elegant and erudite supporters of the performing arts. The justice, who died on September 18 of metastatic cancer, was also an avid cultural tourist, traveling to the Santa Fe and Glimmerglass operas nearly every summer, as well as occasionally returning to catch shows in her native New York City.

Ginsburg's opera fandom was well known, but her tastes were wide-ranging. Particularly in the last 10 years of her life, after Ginsburg lost her beloved husband, Marty, it was not unusual for the petite justice and her security detail to be spotted at theaters several nights a week. She saw everything, from classic musicals to serious new plays, plus performances that defied classification, like Martha Clarke's dance drama Chéri, with Alessandra Ferri and Herman Cornejo, which toured to the Kennedy Center in 2014.

To honor Ginsburg, Dance Magazine asked three dance artists whose performances the justice attended to recall what Ginsburg meant to them.

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