Dance in Pop Culture

Justin Timberlake's Dance Rehearsal Footage Has Us Seriously Excited for the Super Bowl

Football's cool and all, but when Justin Timberlake is bringing new music and dance moves to the halftime stage, it's hard to pay attention to anything else. Luckily, if you can't wait until next weekend's Super Bowl to get your "Filthy" fix, Pepsi shared a behind-the-scenes look at JT's halftime show rehearsals on their Twitter page. Complete with interviews from his longtime choreographer Marty Kudelka (who started working with JT back in his *NSYNC days) and dancers like Dana Wilson, the video gives an inside look at Timberlake's upcoming 13-minute performance.


"It starts with the music—I don't have to draw from too many other places," Kudelka says in the video. "There are no limits, and that's inspiration enough." As for how that translates, Timberlake explains, "He has his own style of movement, and it compliments the way that I like to move onstage—it's crisp without being showboat-y."

Based on the video, it looks like we'll be getting a taste of some new songs from JT's upcoming album Man of the Woods alongside our old faves. No matter what he's singing, we know it will be a high-energy performance.

"A lot of times dancers and the band are thought of as supporting talent, and we're there to lift him up and keep his show strong," Wilson says. "With JT, it's really not the case. I've felt lifted by him. We really are a family—it's not about spotlight and then the ghosts in the background. We walk up on stage as a really unified force."

Dancer Voices
Silas Farley in his Songs from the Spirit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy Farley

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Robin Worrall via Unsplash

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