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Kickstarter Just Launched a New Way to Fund Your Work

Dancers love Kickstarter. Over the past eight years, more than 2,300 dance projects have brought in more than $12 million through campaigns on the site. Even traditional companies like Martha Graham Dance Company and MacArthur "genius" award-winning choreographers like Michelle Dorrance have gotten in on the action.

But starting today, the site is announcing a new platform called Drip that aims to be even more useful for artists. Rather than having to set up a new campaign for each project, artists can build a community of support for their ongoing creative practice. Supporters pay a monthly "subscription" fee for perks like exclusive behind-the-scenes footage, ticket discounts, in-person meet-and-greets with the artists—whatever artists want to offer. And that means the artists can count on a regular pool of funds from fans paying as little as $2 a month.


Drip has technically been around since 2011, but it was created solely for musicians. The platform joined Kickstarter about two years ago, and today's relaunch opens it up to artists across all of the disciplines that Kickstarter serves—including dance.

Right now, choreographer Stephen Petronio is representing our field as one of the first 26 artists on the new site.

So how can you sign up? At the moment, Drip is invite-only. The platform plans to open up to more creators early next year. To stay up to date on when you can apply, just sign up for the newsletter by entering your email on the homepage.


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Last summer, months before the word "coronavirus" became part of our daily lexicon, American Repertory Theater artistic director Diane Paulus started working with an unexpected expert: Joseph Allen, an assistant professor of exposure assessment science at Harvard's H.T. Chan School of Public Health and head of the university's Healthy Buildings Program. According to Boston Magazine, Paulus was starting to plan out A.R.T.'s new venue at Harvard, and wanted to design a "healthy" theater.

So when COVID-19 began shutting everything down, the team had already put in months of work considering how to make a performing arts venue safe. To share their ideas with other theaters, A.R.T. published a blueprint online that will be continually updated. Although the "Roadmap for Recovery and Resilience for Theater" is not meant to be comprehensive or prescriptive, it offers several insightful factors to consider:

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