Larry Keigwin Made Us A Playlist & His Musical Taste Is Just As Fun As His Choreography

If you've ever seen Larry Keigwin's work, you probably guessed that he's a fun guy. His choreography is cheeky and humorous; unexpected and electrifying. And though his aesthetic is decidedly contemporary, there's a touch of that classic modern dance style that makes his partnerships with troupes like Paul Taylor Dance Company and Martha Graham Dance Company so fitting.

His musical taste is pretty similar: eclectic feel-good bops from the contemporary (Justin Bieber) to the classic (Dionne Warwick.) He made us a playlist of the songs that make him move, whether in the studio or in his bedroom:


What He's Doing When He's Listening to These Songs:

"I am most likely dancing 'like nobody is watching' in my bedroom. I listen to this playlist to let go, to warm up, as a motor to generate new moves or to shake up a creative block."

Why He's Always Loved Sheila E's "The Glamorous Life"

"I remember jamming to this song as a teenager. Imagine a 12-year-old boy lip-syncing into a hairbrush....that was me."

Why His Playlists Are So Eclectic

"Variety is the spice of life. I enjoy mixing genres and decades. I like to keep my playlists full of surprises."

On His "Knock On Wood" Nightclub Act

"I actually choreographed to this song and cast one dancer as lightning and another as thunder, both completely covered in body paint."

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Jason Samuels Smith, photographed by Jayme Thornton

Moving Forward by Looking Back: A Week at the L.A. Tap Festival Online

I turned to tap at the outset of the European lockdown as a meaningful escape from the anxiety of the pandemic. As a dance historian specialized in dance film, I've seen my fair share of tap on screen, but my own training remains elementary. While sheltering in place, my old hardwood floors beckoned. I wanted to dig deeper in order to better understand tap's origins and how the art form has evolved today. Not so easy to accomplish in France, especially from home.

Enter the L.A. Tap Fest's first online edition.

Alongside 100 other viewers peering out from our respective Zoom windows, I watch a performer tap out rhythms on a board in their living room. Advanced audio settings allow us to hear their feet. In the chat box, valuable resources are being shared and it's common to see questions like, "Can you post the link to that vaudeville book you mentioned?" Greetings and words of gratitude are also exchanged as participants trickle in and out from various times zones across the US and around the world.

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