It's been a while since we checked in on Lin-Manuel Miranda, who at this point really needs no introduction. Today marks the 10-year anniversary of the Broadway debut of In the Heights, Miranda's first big hit that laid the groundwork for him to revolutionize the Great White Way with Hamilton.

But aside from that, he's had a pretty insane couple of weeks, even by Miranda standards. Here's what you might have missed.


Miranda got emotional telling Oprah about bringing Hamilton to Puerto Rico.

If you can listen to him talk about taking Hamilton home to Puerto Rico without tearing up, you're a lot tougher than we are. He'll be reprising his Tony-nominated role as part of his ongoing efforts to assist with recovery after Hurricane Maria. The hit musical lands in Puerto Rico January 2019.

We got our first glimpse of him in Mary Poppins Returns.

The teaser trailer for the sequel to the seminal movie musical is—dare we say it?—positively supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. (We're hoping for just a smidge more dancing in the full trailers.) It dropped during the Academy Awards, during which Miranda and his co-star Emily Blunt presented the award for Best Original Song (the category in which he was nominated last year for Moana).

Hamilton set a new record for Olivier Award nominations.

Lin-Manuel Miranda and the original Broadway cast of Hamilton. Photo by Joan Marcus, Courtesy Hamilton

Hamilton has broken so many records at this point that it's practically blasé, but scooping up 13 Olivier Award nominations (the British equivalent of the Tony Awards) is incredible. Beyond the Best New Musical nomination, Miranda is up for Outstanding Achievement in Music, Andy Blankenbuehler got a nod for Best Theater Choreographer and the West End cast has nominations in every eligible acting category except Best Actress in a Musical (including three of the four Actor in a Supporting Role nominations).

Miranda did an incredible, ridiculous lip sync performance of Weird Al's "The Hamilton Polka."

The March 2 February 30 Hamildrop was a Hamilton reimagining/remix/mashup by none other than "Weird Al" Yankovic. And if that weren't crazy enough, Miranda and Yankovic teamed up with Jimmy Fallon for an epic lip sync of the track.

Latest Posts


Rachel Papo

Our 8 Best Pointe Shoe Hacks

It turns out that TikTok is good for more than just viral dance challenges. Case in point: We recently stumbled across this genius pointe shoe hack for dancers with narrow heels.

Dancers are full of all kinds of crafty tricks to make their pointe shoes work for them. But don't fear: You don't need to spend hours scrolling TikTok to find the best pro tips. We rounded up a few of our favorites published in Dance Magazine over the years.

If your vamp isn't long enough, sew an elastic on top of your metatarsals.

Last year, Pacific Northwest Ballet principal Elizabeth Murphy admitted to us that her toes used to flop all the way out of her shoes when she rose up onto pointe(!). "I have really long toes and stock shoes never had a vamp long enough," she says.

Her fix? Sewing a piece of elastic (close to the drawstring but without going through it) at the top of the vamp for more support...and also special-ordering higher vamps.

Solve corns with toe socks

Nashville Ballet's Sarah Cordia told us in 2017 that toe socks are her secret weapon: "I get soft corns in between my toes because I have sweaty feet. Wearing toe socks helps keep that area dry. I found a half-toe sock called 'five-toe heelless half-boat socks' that I now wear in my pointe shoes."

(For other padding game-changers, check out these six ideas.)

Save time by recycling ribbons and elastics.

Don't waste time measuring new ribbons and elastics for every pair. Washington Ballet dancer Ashley Murphy-Wilson told us that she keeps and cycles through about 10 sets of ribbons and crisscross elastics. "It makes sewing new pairs easier because the ribbons and elastic are already at the correct length," she says. Bonus: This also makes your pointe shoe habit more environmentally friendly.

Close-up of hands sewing a pointe shoe.

Murphy-Wilson sewing her shoes

xmbphotography, by Mena Brunette, courtesy The Washington Ballet

Tie your drawstring on demi-pointe.

In 2007, New York City Ballet's Megan Fairchild gave us this tip for making sure her drawstring stays tight: "I always tie it in demi-pointe because that is when there's the biggest gap and where there's the most bagginess on the side."

Find a stronger thread.

When it comes to keeping your ribbons on, function trumps form—audiences won't be able to see your stitches from the stage. Many dancers use floss as a stronger, more secure alternative to thread. Fairchild told us she uses thick crochet thread. "Before I go onstage I sew a couple of stitches in the knot of the ribbon to tack the ends," she says. "I do a big 'X.' I have to make sure it's perfect because I'm in it for the show. It's always the very last thing I do."

Don't simply reorder your shoes on autopilot.

Even as adults, our feet keep growing and spreading as we age. Atlanta podiatrist Frank Sinkoe suggests going to a professional pointe shoe fitter at least once a year to make sure you're in the right shoe.

You might even need different sizes at different times of the year, says New York City Ballet podiatric consultant Thomas Novella. During busy periods and in warm weather, your feet might be bigger than during slow periods in the winter. Have different pairs ready for what your feet need now.

Fit *both* feet.

Don't forget that your feet might even be two different sizes. "If you're getting toenail bruises, blood blisters or other signs of compression, but only on one foot, have someone check each foot's size," Novella says. The solution? Buy two pairs at a time—one for the right foot and one for the left.

Wash off the sweat.

Blisters thrive in a sweaty pointe shoe. Whenever you can, take your feet out of your shoes between rehearsals and give them a quick rinse off in the sink. "If feet sweat, they should be washed periodically during the day with soap and water and dried well, especially between the toes," says Sinkoe.