Broadway

The Danciest Musicals on Netflix and Amazon Right Now

Forget Netflix and chill. Here at Dance Magazine, we're more about Netflix and show tunes! Thanks to the internet, you can stream live recordings of hit musicals from the comfort of your own couch. We gathered the danciest shows available right now.


Newsies

Where to stream: Netflix

Why it's worth a watch: Grab the popcorn and kick up your feet while the Newsies hit the streets selling papes. Broadway's Newsies is a nonstop dance parade, with turns and flips and tapping aplenty choreographed by Christopher Gattelli. Members from original cast and the national tour reunited for this special live taping. Let them seize the day while you relax on the couch.

RENT

Where to stream: Amazon (additional fee applies)

Why it's worth a watch: This live Broadway recording was filmed at the end of the RENT's phenomenal 12-year run. Be on the lookout for a pre-Hamilton Renée Elise Goldsberry, who joined the cast as Mimi shortly before it closed. Marlies Yearby's choreography ramps up the party atmosphere for raucous numbers like "La Vie Bohème."

Shrek

Where to stream: Netflix

Why it's worth a watch: Whether or not you've seen the movie version of Shrek, we recommend watching the Broadway version instead. This Best Musical nominee stars Sutton Foster as Princess Fiona and is packed with Josh Prince's choreography, performed by an army of spunky fairy-tale creatures.

Billy Elliot

Where to stream: Amazon (additional fee applies)

Why it's worth the watch: The story of a young boxer-turned-ballet-dancer comes to you live from the West End production. It's chock-full of Peter Darling's choreography that runs the gamut from comical to inspirational.

Carousel

Where to stream: Amazon Prime

Why it's worth a watch: This 2013 live recording from Lincoln Center isn't a fully staged Carousel, but it does feature many Broadway heavy hitters, like Kelli O'Hara and Jessie Mueller singing to orchestrations performed by the New York Philharmonic. And the second act ballet, choreographed by Warren Carlyle in this version, is danced by none other than Tiler Peck and Robert Fairchild.

The Creative Process
Rehearsal of Yvonne Rainer's Parts of Some Sextets. Photo by Paula Court, Courtesy Performa.

Yvonne Rainer's Parts of Some Sextets (AKA "the mattress dance") hasn't been revived since it premiered in 1965. Nor has Rainer had any wish to do it again, to ask performers to heave 10 mattresses around while carrying out 31 tasks that changed every 30 seconds. It was an unwieldy, difficult dance. (Even the title is unwieldy.) But Emily Coates, who has danced in Rainer's work for 20 years, became curious about this piece and was determined to see it again—and to dance in it. She will get her wish November 15–17, when the mattress dance will be performed as part of the Performa 19 Biennial.

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Sponsored by NYCDA
Ailey II artistic director Troy Powell teaching an Ailey Workshop at NYCDA. Courtesy NYCDA

Back in 2011 when Joe Lanteri first approached Katie Langan, chair of Marymount Manhattan College's dance department, about getting involved with New York City Dance Alliance, she was skeptical about the convention/competition world.

"But I was pleasantly surprised by the enormity of talent that was there," she says. "His goal was to start scholarship opportunities, and I said okay, I'm in."

Today, it's fair to say that Lanteri has far surpassed his goal of creating scholarship opportunities. But NYCDA has done so much more, bridging the gap between the convention world and the professional world by forging a wealth of partnerships with dance institutions from Marymount to The Ailey School to Complexions Contemporary Ballet and many more. There's a reason these companies and schools—some of whom otherwise may not see themselves as aligned with the convention/competition world—keep deepening their relationships with NYCDA.

Now, college scholarships are just one of many ways NYCDA has gone beyond the typical weekend-long convention experience and created life-changing opportunities for students. We rounded up some of the most notable ones:

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Health & Body
Getty Images

Nadine Kaslow, a psychologist who works with dancers at Atlanta Ballet, offers tips for creating a more body-positive studio experience:

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Sponsored by Harlequin Floors
Left: Hurricane Harvey damage in Houston Ballet's Dance Lab; Courtesy Harlequin. Right: The Dance Lab pre-Harvey; Nic Lehoux, Courtesy Houston Ballet.

"The show must go on" may be a platitude we use to get through everything from costume malfunctions to stormy moods. But when it came to overcoming a literal hurricane, Houston Ballet was buoyed by this mantra to go from devastated to dancing in a matter of weeks—with the help of Harlequin Floors, Houston Ballet's longstanding partner who sprang into action to build new floors in record time.

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