Dance on Broadway

The Danciest Musicals on Netflix and Amazon Right Now

Carry the banner with the energetic cast of Newsies from your couch. Screenshot via Netflix.

Forget Netflix and chill. Here at Dance Magazine, we're more about Netflix and show tunes! Thanks to the internet, you can stream live recordings of hit musicals from the comfort of your own couch. We gathered the danciest shows available right now.


Newsies

Where to stream: Netflix

Why it's worth a watch: Grab the popcorn and kick up your feet while the Newsies hit the streets selling papes. Broadway's Newsies is a nonstop dance parade, with turns and flips and tapping aplenty choreographed by Christopher Gattelli. Members from original cast and the national tour reunited for this special live taping. Let them seize the day while you relax on the couch.

RENT

Where to stream: Amazon (additional fee applies)

Why it's worth a watch: This live Broadway recording was filmed at the end of the RENT's phenomenal 12-year run. Be on the lookout for a pre-Hamilton Renée Elise Goldsberry, who joined the cast as Mimi shortly before it closed. Marlies Yearby's choreography ramps up the party atmosphere for raucous numbers like "La Vie Bohème."

Shrek

Where to stream: Netflix

Why it's worth a watch: Whether or not you've seen the movie version of Shrek, we recommend watching the Broadway version instead. This Best Musical nominee stars Sutton Foster as Princess Fiona and is packed with Josh Prince's choreography, performed by an army of spunky fairy-tale creatures.

Billy Elliot

Where to stream: Amazon (additional fee applies)

Why it's worth the watch: The story of a young boxer-turned-ballet-dancer comes to you live from the West End production. It's chock-full of Peter Darling's choreography that runs the gamut from comical to inspirational.

Carousel

Where to stream: Amazon Prime

Why it's worth a watch: This 2013 live recording from Lincoln Center isn't a fully staged Carousel, but it does feature many Broadway heavy hitters, like Kelli O'Hara and Jessie Mueller singing to orchestrations performed by the New York Philharmonic. And the second act ballet, choreographed by Warren Carlyle in this version, is danced by none other than Tiler Peck and Robert Fairchild.

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Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy Mark Morris Dance Group

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