Dance History

Celebrate Margot Fonteyn's 100th Birthday With 50 Rarely-Seen Photos From Our Archives

Still of Fonteyn from the 1972 film I Am a Dancer. Photo courtesy DM Archives

On May 18, 1919, Margot "Peggy" Hookham was born. She would grow up to become Dame Margot Fonteyn, England's first homegrown prima ballerina. She joined the Sadler's Wells School in 1934 and was performing principal roles with the precursor to The Royal Ballet the next year. Fonteyn was a company-defining figure, dancing Aurora for the re-opening of the Royal Opera House after World War II, creating numerous roles with Sir Frederick Ashton and forging a legendary partnership with Rudolf Nureyev.


In the August 1948 issue of Dance Magazine, Arnold Haskell wrote of her, "Although Margot Fonteyn is an exceptionally hard and conscientious worker, she is fundamentally a lazy person. Her dream is to retire at thirty-five and to live in some warm climate, getting up late, going to bed late, swimming and enjoying the good things of the table. She has not the slightest desire of ever producing a ballet, and the very idea of teaching appalls her." Fonteyn continued to perform until she was 60 years old.

Below are our 50 favorite photos of the legendary ballerina from our archives.

Courtesy DM Archives

Fonteyn and members of The Royal Ballet out swimming, circa 1957

The Conversation
James Whiteside (Jayme Thornton for Dance Magazine)

Say you're perpetually impeccable designer Thom Browne. Say you're planning your Spring 2020 Paris menswear show along a "Versailles country club" theme. Say you want a world-class danseur to open the show with some kind of appropriately fabulous choreography.

Who do you call? James Whiteside, of course. On Saturday, the American Ballet Theatre principal—wearing pointe shoes and a glorious pinstriped tutu—kicked off Browne's presentation at the École des Beaux-Arts with a 15-minute, show-stealing solo. Whiteside choreographed the piece himself, with the help of detailed notes from the designer.

Keep reading... Show less
Health & Body
Getty Images

I'd been a professional dancer for five years when I realized the pain I'd been feeling in my hip and down my sciatic nerve was not going away. I had been treating it for two years as we dancers do—with regular visits to my masseuse, physical therapy, baths, ice and lots of Aleve—but I never stopped dancing. It finally dawned on me that if I kept going at the speed I was going (which was, well, speedy), the pain would only get more severe and unrelenting, and I might never dance again.

I told myself I'd take two months off, and all would be better.

That first morning when I woke up at 10 am, I had no idea what to do with myself. My life until that moment had been dictated by class and rehearsal, every hour accounted for. How should I fill the huge swath of time ahead of me?

Keep reading... Show less

mailbox

Get Dance Magazine in your inbox