Photo by Joe Toreno

Mark Kanemura Is Hosting Instagram Dance Parties That You Can Attend While Social Distancing

It's grim out there right now, as the world comes to grips with the scope of the coronavirus pandemic. But while social distancing efforts may mean canceled dance classes and performances, there are still so many ways to find joy in dance. And nobody combines "joy" and "dance" better than Mark Kanemura, the Instacelebrity and former Lady Gaga dancer, who has started to host virtual dance parties on Instagram.


Kanemura's 663K-odd followers have been (digitally) gathering daily since Thursday for his Instagram Live dance parties, in which he not only gets down "with" the crowd, but also checks in with everyone to see how they're feeling in this surreal moment. Because Mark is essentially a rainbow in human form, the 10-minute dance breaks involve "wigs, fans, confetti and a lot of really great pop music," as he told TODAY.

For more details about the next party, keep your eyes glued to Kanemura's (generally delightful) Insta account. If you're stuck at home, if you're missing the dance studio, if you're just looking for some more happiness in your life: Join in. BYORW (bring your own rainbow wig).

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Still frrom Shobana Jeyasingh's Contagion, courtesy Sadler's Wells

This Free Online Festival Showcases the Crème de la Crème of the U.K. Dance Scene

As most theaters across the world remain closed, London's contemporary dance hub Sadler's Wells and cultural broadcaster BBC Arts have come together to produce a day-long digital dance festival on January 28.

Dancing Nation will showcase 15 new and beloved works by world-class, U.K.-based companies and choreographers over three hour-long, pre-recorded segments. Highlights will include Akram Khan and Natalia Osipova performing together for the first time in Mud of Sorrow: Touch, a new work inspired by Khan's 2006 duet with Sylvie Guillem; Matthew Bourne's New Adventures' seminal 1988 work Spitfire; and Shobana Jeyasingh's timely restaging of Contagion, which explores the spread of the virus that caused the Spanish flu pandemic in 1918.

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February 2021