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Meet Ari Groover: the Broadway Dancer Who Moonlights as a DJ

Ari Groover (center) became a muse for Head Over Heels' movement style. Photo by Joan Marcus, courtesy Boneau/Bryan-Brown.

Earlier this year, Ari Groover faced the ultimate Broadway champagne problem: She was offered a contract for both Summer: The Donna Summer Musical and Head Over Heels. She ultimately chose Head Over Heels, and watching her in the show, it's easy to see why she's in such demand: Groover is a consummate storyteller, imbuing Spencer Liff's jaw-droppingly complicated choreography with seemingly endless energy and sly wit.


Broadway shows: Currently in Head Over Heels (through January 6, 2019). Past: Holler If Ya Hear Me
Age: 27
Hometown: Savannah, Georgia
Training: Savannah State University (her mother was a dance professor, so she trained there as a child and teen) and Atlanta's Southwest Arts Center and Alliance Theatre

Breakout moment: After high school, Groover mostly stopped performing, instead studying illustration. Then, after Broadway Dreams' 2012 Atlanta intensive, she was invited to try out for the off-Broadway musical Bare. "I was happy just being in New York," she says. After the production, she auditioned for every show she could.

What Spencer Liff is saying: "When Ari auditioned for Head Over Heels, she was not what I was looking for," says Liff. "While other girls were kicking and turning in their improv, Ari was voguing and doing death drops." She became a muse for the show's movement style, and, Liff adds, "Ari was the only ensemble member we made a direct offer to once we knew we were moving from the workshop to Broadway."

Groover (far left) with the ensemble of Head Over Heels. Photo by Joan Marcus, courtesy Boneau/Bryan-Brown.

Triple duty: In her featured ensemble track, Groover is one of two "page turners," who dance in every scene transition. She also understudies two principal roles: the dutiful handmaid Mopsa and the enigmatic oracle Pythio. "Dancers are not just behind the scenes in this show," she says. "We play, analyze and lead as much as anyone."

"She's a prime example of breaking the mold to be your own best version of yourself."

—Spencer Liff

Trial by fire: As associate choreographer for American Repertory Theater's Burn All Night, Groover had to step in when choreographer Sam Pinkleton couldn't attend a week of rehearsals. "I came up with a choreographic blueprint," she says. Luckily, it wasn't her first stab at dancemaking. Her 2017 short dance film Permission has collected prizes at regional film festivals. "It's important to me that women of color not only be onstage, but also behind how things happen and how stories are told," Groover says.

Turning the tables: After Holler If Ya Hear Me closed, Groover learned to deejay as a creative part-time job. "It's dance-related in that you need to make songs flow together." Recently, she's spun at Soho House New York and at post-performance parties for Summer and Head Over Heels.

Broadway
Courtesy Macy's, Inc.

As you're prepping your Thanksgiving meal, why not throw in a dash of dance?

This year's Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is stuffed (pun intended) with performances from four stellar Broadway shows, the Radio City Rockettes and students from three New York City dance institutions.

Tune in to NBC November 28 from 9 am to noon (in all time zones), or catch the rebroadcast at 2 pm (also in all time zones). Here's what's in store:

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Sponsored by NYCDA
Ailey II artistic director Troy Powell teaching an Ailey Workshop at NYCDA. Courtesy NYCDA

Back in 2011 when Joe Lanteri first approached Katie Langan, chair of Marymount Manhattan College's dance department, about getting involved with New York City Dance Alliance, she was skeptical about the convention/competition world.

"But I was pleasantly surprised by the enormity of talent that was there," she says. "His goal was to start scholarship opportunities, and I said okay, I'm in."

Today, it's fair to say that Lanteri has far surpassed his goal of creating scholarship opportunities. But NYCDA has done so much more, bridging the gap between the convention world and the professional world by forging a wealth of partnerships with dance institutions from Marymount to The Ailey School to Complexions Contemporary Ballet and many more. There's a reason these companies and schools—some of whom otherwise may not see themselves as aligned with the convention/competition world—keep deepening their relationships with NYCDA.

Now, college scholarships are just one of many ways NYCDA has gone beyond the typical weekend-long convention experience and created life-changing opportunities for students. We rounded up some of the most notable ones:

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Rant & Rave
Sergei Polunin. Photo by British Broadcasting Corporation and Polunin Ltd., Courtesy Sundance Selects.

Last week, Variety reported that Sergei Polunin would reunite with the team behind Dancer for another documentary. "Where 'Dancer' looked at his whole life, family and influences," director Steven Cantor said, " 'Satori' will focus more squarely on his creative process as performer and, for the first time ever, choreographer." The title references a poorly received evening of work by the same name first presented by Polunin in 2017. (It recently toured to Moscow and St. Petersburg.)

I cannot be the only person wondering why we should care.

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Sponsored by Harlequin Floors
Left: Hurricane Harvey damage in Houston Ballet's Dance Lab; Courtesy Harlequin. Right: The Dance Lab pre-Harvey; Nic Lehoux, Courtesy Houston Ballet.

"The show must go on" may be a platitude we use to get through everything from costume malfunctions to stormy moods. But when it came to overcoming a literal hurricane, Houston Ballet was buoyed by this mantra to go from devastated to dancing in a matter of weeks—with the help of Harlequin Floors, Houston Ballet's longstanding partner who sprang into action to build new floors in record time.

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