Dance As Activism

Midterm Elections Are Nov. 6. Treat Them Like a Performance: Show Up

Dancers want you to vote! Screenshot via Dance for Democracy video.

The midterm elections are less than three weeks away on November 6. If you're registered to vote, hooray!

But you can't fully celebrate before you've completed your mission. Showing up at the polls is what matters most—especially since voter turnout for midterms doesn't have a fabulous track record. According to statistics from FairVote, about 40 percent of the population that is eligible to vote actually casts a ballot during midterm elections.

Many members of the dance community are making it clear that they want that percentage go up, and they're using social media to take a stand. Here's how they're getting involved:


Rachel Neville's #movethevote

On August 20, popular dance photographer Rachel Neville announced her #movethevote campaign. Since then, she's been steadily posting photographs of dancers clad in white, all wearing a bar of bold red lipstick across their face. Some of the images include political statistics or messages about what's at stake—big issues like women's rights, gun control and arts advocacy just to name a few.

Her subjects are well-known performers, like New York City Ballet's Ashley Bouder, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Fana Tesfagiorgis and Neil Haskell, who's currently in Hamilton. Not only do they take arresting photographs, but they have robust social media followings, which will hopefully help boost voter turnout.

Dance for Democracy

Another dancer-driven campaign is Dance for Democracy, which released a video featuring choreography by a host of dancer-activists, including Debbie Allen, Kenny Ortega, Chloe Arnold and Wade Robson.

UPDATE 10/25: "Blue Wave," choreographed and directed by Andrew Winghart

Since posting this original story, another dance-heavy campaign has started gaining ground. Andrew Winghart has teamed up with Swing Left, a grassroots organization that aims to inspire more votes for Democratic candidates in swing districts. The video above, directed and choreographed by Winghart, features his signature brand of unison and canon moves en masse to make a powerful statement. It's set to a soundtrack of Sia's "Never Give Up" with voiceovers from volunteers explaining why your vote matters.

Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS' #beltthevote

And if you're more of the song-and-dance type, Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS is encouraging voter registration with its #betlthevote campaign. ("You vote, Glen Coco!") We don't care whether you sing or dance your way to the polls, as long as you get there. See you November 6!

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