Fox produced a live broadcast of Rent in January—but could an original musical be next? Photo by Kevin Estrada, Courtesy Fox

Is Musical Theater Made for Small-Screen Consumption on the Horizon?

When a musical prepares to make the transfer from a smaller, lesser-known venue to Broadway (where theaters hold 500-plus seats), often there's a collective intake of breath from all involved. After all, a bigger house means more tickets to sell in order to stay in the black, and sometimes shows with even the most tenacious fan bases can't quite navigate such a jump. But what about the transfer from stage…to screen? Is Broadway ready to be consumed from the comfort of your couch?


Netflix thinks so. In December, the streaming giant adapted one of the final performances of Springsteen on Broadway—Bruce Springsteen's limited-engagement show at the Walter Kerr Theatre—into a film, released the day after the show closed. In February, Netflix produced what star Kerry Washington called a "movie/play hybrid" of American Son, which began filming just after the play finished its run at the Booth Theatre. And just last month, it was announced that two Broadway shows are being adapted into feature films by Netflix: The Boys in the Band, a play that ran last summer with a star-studded cast, and The Prom, which received seven Tony nominations (including Best Musical). If the trend continues, this could mean big things in terms of Broadway's accessibility. People who can't afford pricey tickets, don't live in New York City or can't snag seats to a sold-out show (ahem, Hamilton) could finally watch not-live-but-almost theater from their living rooms.

Netflix isn't the only one with its eye on the Great White Way either. Fox announced earlier this year that it's considering developing its own jukebox musicals (that is, shows using the songs of only one artist) for television—and the company has already approached a few pop artists it would like to work with. Fox has had varying degrees of success with its live performances of well-known musicals, like Rent (which aired in January to 3.4 million viewers) and Grease (their most-watched, with 12.2 million viewers in January 2016). Filming an already-written and time-tested musical for live television is a very different venture, of course, from creating one from near-scratch. But the network is no slouch when it comes to production value, at least. For example, Thomas Kail (the director of Hamilton on Broadway), stepped in as director of Fox's Grease: Live—which cost $16 million to make.

As tantalizing as this news is for hardcore Broadway and couch-potato fans alike, it looks like only time will tell if Netflix's and Fox's plans pan out—and snag enough viewers to stay viable.

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Clockwise from top left: Photo by Loreto Jamlig, Courtesy Ladies of Hip-Hop; Wikimedia Commons; Photo by Alexander Iziliaev, Courtesy Pennsylvania Ballet; Natasha Razina, Courtesy State Academic Mariinsky Theatre; Photo by Will Mayer for Better Half Productions, Courtesy ABT

The 10 Biggest Dance Stories of 2019

What were the dance moments that defined 2019? The stories that kept us talking, week after week? According to our top-clicked articles of the year, they ranged from explorations of dance medicine and dance history, takedowns of Lara Spencer and companies who still charge dancers to audition, and, of course, our list of expert tips on how to succeed in dance today.

We compiled our 10 biggest hits of the year, and broke down why we think they struck a chord:

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Christopher Duggan, Courtesy Nichols

I Am a Black Dancer Who Was Dressed Up in Blackface to Perform in La Bayadère

On Instagram this week, Misty Copeland reposted a picture of two Russian ballerinas covered head to toe in black, exposing the Bolshoi's practice of using blackface in the classical ballet La Bayadère. The post has already received over 60,000 likes and 2,000 comments, starting a long overdue conversation.

Comments have been pouring in from every angle imaginable: from history lessons on black face, to people outside of the ballet world expressing disbelief that this happens in 2019, to castigations of Copeland for exposing these young girls to the line of fire for what is ultimately the Bolshoi's costuming choice, to the accusations that the girls—no matter their cultural competence—should have known better.

I am a black dancer, and in 2003, when I was 11 years old, I was dressed up in blackface to perform in the Mariinsky Ballet's production of La Bayadère.

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Here's the First Trailer for the "In the Heights" Movie

Lights up on Washington Heights—because the trailer for the movie adaptation of the hit Broadway musical In the Heights has arrived. It's our first look into Lin-Manuel Miranda's latest venture into film—because LMM isn't stopping at three Tony awards, a Grammy award, and an Emmy.

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