Style & Beauty

Natalie Gilmore Shares Her Stage Makeup Must-Haves & Life on the Road With Justin Timberlake's Man of the Woods Tour

Natalie Gilmore (center) with the Man of the Woods tour dancers. Mark Nguyen, courtesy of Gilmore.

With limited space for luggage on the tour bus, Justin Timberlake dancer Natalie Gilmore makes sure her beauty routine can pull double duty. "Most of the stuff I use day to day I also use onstage," she says, adding that the dancers do their own hair and makeup for every show. "They give us a lot of freedom to use what we want, and I really enjoy getting to play with new products and experiment with different looks." That same freedom she has with her look carries over into her performance. "There's a lot of freestyle in the show," Gilmore says. "We have certain places we need to be, but we're able to map out how we want things to flow—I have a lot of fun with it."


Gilmore's day-of-show routine is fairly consistent no matter what look she's trying (or what country she's in). "When we get to the venue, I'll do some prep on my face before going to sound check," she says. "I like to do some kind of warm-up an hour and a half before the show to get my blood going and my mind working, but I like it to flow with how I feel. If I want an extra push, I'll do an ab workout, or I'll focus on stretching if I'm feeling tired that day."


Photo by Jayme Thornton

1) NYX Soft Matte Lip Cream, $6.49
"These stay through the whole show, and they actually work best if you don't wear any balm underneath them."

2) Kat Von D Tattoo Liner in Trooper Black, $20
"It has a felt tip that makes it easy to get a straight line without too many mess-ups. Usually, I'll do a bit of a wing to open up the eye, and then I use a regular pencil liner on the waterline."

3) Tarte Maracuja C-Brighter Eye Treatment, $38
"I'm quite simple when it comes to skin care. I wash my face after every show, use an SPF moisturizer, and I use this eye cream morning and night to brighten dark circles."

4) Ardell Lash Wispies Black, $4.99
"Always a go-to— these are the best false lashes."

5) Laura Mercier Tinted Moisturizer, $45
"It doesn't feel super-heavy or clog my pores. I'm putting stage makeup on every other day, so I have to be conscious of what products I'm using."

6) Tarte Lights, Camera, Lashes 4-in-1 Mascara, $23
"This is currently one of my favorites."

7) Fenty Beauty By Rihanna Match Stix Trio in Medium, $54
"I just got this set from Rihanna's line and she nailed it. There's a contour, highlight and concealer—plus, they're magnetic, so you don't lose them."

Health & Body
Sara Mearns in the gym. Photo by Kyle Froman.

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"I said, 'I can't. My body won't,' " she says. "He told me, 'Yes, it will.' "

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Sponsored by Harlequin Floors
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Alicia Alonso with Igor Youskevitch. Sedge Leblang, Courtesy Dance Magazine Archives.

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At eight, Alicia Alonso took her first ballet class on a stage in her native Cuba, wearing street clothes. Fifteen years later, put in for an ailing Alicia Markova in a performance of Giselle with Ballet Theatre, she staked her claim to that title role.

Alonso received recognition throughout the world for her flawless technique and her ability to become one with the characters she danced, even after she became nearly blind. After a career in New York, she and her then husband Fernando Alonso established the Cuban National Ballet and the Cuban National Ballet School, both of which grew into major international dance powerhouses and beloved institutions in their home country. On October 17, the company announced that, after leading the company for a remarkable 71 years, Alonso died from cardiovascular disease at the age of 98.

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News
Rauf "RubberlLegz" Yasit and Parvaneh Scharafali. Photo by Mohamed Sadek, courtesy The Shed

William Forsythe is bringing his multi-faceted genius to New York City in stripped down form. His "Quiet Evening of Dance," a mix of new and recycled work now at The Shed until October 25, is co-commissioned with Sadler's Wells in London (and a slew of European presenters).

As always, Forsythe's choreography is a layered experience, both kinetic and intellectual. This North American premiere prompted many thoughts, which I whittled down to seven.

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