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New York Notebook

Astral Traveling

The opening image of Trisha Brown’s Astral Converted is one of the most stunning of any postmodern piece. Are the silvery figures on the floor fish? Are they mechanics? Are they angels lined up in a row? In any case, each move they make is detected by motion sensors on Robert Rauschenberg’s industrial towers, thereby affecting John Cage’s music. Astral Converted (originally Astral Convertible) is now being revived, thanks to a residency on Governors Island through River to River that includes workshops and talks. Performances are July 10–14 at the Park Avenue Armory.   www.trishabrowncompany.org

 

Diane Madden and Greg Lara in Astral Converted. Photo by Lois Greenfield, Courtesy TBDC.

 

 

More from River to River

The River to River festival produces the kind of event that makes the Big Apple fun in the summer months. This year it gives young choreographers a chance to retool finished works to fit into an outdoor site in the city. The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, which organizes the festival, is great at finding street corners, alleyways, and parks that you never thought were danceable. Watch for performances by Maria Hassabi, Juliana May, and Beth Gill. Also keep an eye out for River to River’s Tap It Out day at the World Financial Center and JoAnna Mendl Shaw’s installation on Governors Island.  www.lmcc.net

 

STREB at last year’s River to River festival. Photo by Godlis, Courtesy LMCC.

 

 

Back to Where He’s Never Been

Sweet, silly, and sly, Al Blackstone’s infectious girl-meets-boy romp, Brown Eyed Girl, swept the Capezio A.C.E. Awards last summer at the Dance Teacher Summit. He returns this month with Happy We’ll Be, a new 75-minute show in the style of musical theater with a cast of 15. The story is told through movement, he says, “almost like a silent film.” For Blackstone the venue has special significance: His parents used to dance the night away at Roseland before he was born. Happy We’ll Be heads the series of A.C.E. Awards shows that includes 2011 runners-up Nathan Makolandra and Billy Bell. July 26–30 at Roseland Ballroom.  www.roselandballroom.com or www.alblackstone.net

 

Al Blackstone. Photo by Jeremy Davis, Courtesy Blackstone.

Dance Training
Robin Worrall via Unsplash

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UA Dance Ensemble members Candice Barth and Gregory Taylor in Jessica Lang's "Among the Stars." Photo by Ed Flores, courtesy University of Arizona

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The University of Arizona, located in the heart of Tucson, acclimates dancers to the pace and rigor of company life while offering all the academic opportunities of a globally-ranked university. If you're looking to get a head-start on your professional dance career—or to just have a college experience that balances company-level training and repertory with rigorous academics—the University of Arizona's undergraduate and graduate programs have myriad opportunites to offer:

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Alice Sheppard/Kinetic Light in DESCENT, which our readers chose as last year's "Most Moving Performance." Photo by Jay Newman, courtesy Kinetic Light

Yes, we realize it's only August. But we can't help but to already be musing about all the incredible dance happenings of 2019.

We're getting ready for our annual Readers' Choice feature, and we want to hear from you about the shows you can't stop thinking about, the dance videos that blew your mind and the artists you discovered this year who everyone should know about.

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Dance History
Sergei Diaghilev, who was terrified of the sea, posing with a life preserver aboard a ship. Photo courtesy DM Archives

On August 19, 1929, shockwaves were felt throughout the dance world as news spread that impresario Sergei Diaghilev had died. The founder of the Ballets Russes rewrote the course of ballet history as the company toured Europe and the U.S., championing collaborations with modernist composers, artists and designers such as Igor Stravinsky, Pablo Picasso and Coco Chanel. The company launched the careers of its five principal choreographers: Michel Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Léonide Massine, Bronislava Nijinska and George Balanchine.

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