Meet NYCB's Interim Leadership Team

On Saturday, New York City Ballet announced who will be leading the company while ballet master in chief Peter Martins is on a self-requested leave of absence amidst an ongoing investigation into sexual harassment allegations.


The decision, made by NYCB's board, was somewhat surprising. Instead of choosing one interim director, they appointed a team of four: resident choreographer and soloist Justin Peck and ballet masters Jonathan Stafford, Rebecca Krohn and Craig Hall. Stafford will lead the group.

Though the team is relatively green when it comes to the leadership side of ballet, all four are undoubtably familiar with the current workings of NYCB. Krohn transitioned from principal dancer to ballet master in October, while Hall, a former soloist, assumed the same role in 2016. Former principal Stafford has the most experience on that side of the studio—he began his duties as ballet master during his last season as a performer in 2013–14.

We wish the team luck as they step up during such a busy performance season. Dance Magazine will continue its coverage of this developing story, including Martins' future as it relates to NYCB.

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TaraMarie Perri in tree pose at Storm King Art Center. Photo by Sophie Kuller, Courtesy Perri

5 Self-Soothing Exercises You Can Do to Calm Your Anxiety

Physical stillness can be one of the hardest things to master in dance. But stillness in the bigger sense—like when your career and life are on hold—goes against every dancers' natural instincts.

"Dancers are less comfortable with stillness and change than most," says TaraMarie Perri, founder and director of Perri Institute for Mind and Body and Mind Body Dancer. "Through daily discipline, we are trained to move through space and are attracted to forward momentum. Simply put, dancers are far more comfortable when they have a sense of control over the movements and when life is 'in action.' "

To regain that sense of control, and soothe some of the anxiety most of us are feeling right now, it helps to do what we know best: Get back into our bodies. Certain movements and shapes can help ground us, calm our nervous system and bring us into the present.

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